Welcome to The Document Foundation Planet

This is a feed aggregator that collects what LibreOffice and Document Foundation contributors are writing in their respective blogs.

To have your blog added to this aggregator, please mail the website@global.libreoffice.org mailinglist or file a ticket in Redmine.


Friday
30 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-30 Friday

21:00 UTC

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  • Slept poorly, H. not well . Out to the Quaker meeting in the morning with Dad, M & E to setup tables. Home for some lunch.
  • Parents' fiftieth wedding anniversary dance and party in the evening - lovely to catch-up with the wider family, enjoy some fine food. Back to M&D's for more evening celebration. A wonderful blessing to have a faithful, stable family.

Thursday
29 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-29 Thursday

21:00 UTC

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  • Up late, shreddies & bacon sandwiches; packed and drove north to see M&D. Greggs on the way. Set too sorting through bottles for the party, moving tables etc. R&A&tribe arrived in time for dinner.

Wednesday
28 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-28 Wednesday

21:00 UTC

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  • Up lateish, breakfast, presents, did some lego assembly with E. Lunch, chat with H. took the babes to the park to learn to cycle & scoot with H. and M.
  • Played games, slugged about happily. Fine dinner. Collected M's phone from the play-ground late at night together.

Tuesday
27 December, 2022


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Ekipa jamstva kakovosti LibreOffice (QA Team) ponosno objavlja, da je za preizkušanje na voljo prvi kandidat za izdajo LibreOffice 7.5 Community!


LibreOffice 7.5 Community bo izšel v začetku februarja 2023 (podrobnosti preverite v načrtu izdaj - v angl. jeziku), pri čemer je LibreOffice 7.5 Community RC1 tretja predizdaja od začetka razvoja izdaje 7.5 sredi junija 2022. Od prejšnje izdaje (LibreOffice 7.5 Community beta1) je zabeleženih 213 objav spremembe kode v skladišču kode ter odpravljenih 70 napak. Preverite poslovenjene opombe ob izdaji, kjer najdete vse podrobnosti o novostih, vključenih v to različico LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 7.5 Community RC1 lahko prenesete s tega mesta za sisteme Linux, macOS in Windows, z njeno namestitvijo pa boste zamenjali standardno izdajo.

Če naletite na kakršno koli težavi s to predizdajo, o težavah poročajte v sistemu Bugzilla (potrebujete le veljaven e-poštni račun, da ustvarite nov račun).

Za pomoč se lahko obrnete neposredno na ekipo QA v kanalu QA na IRC ali prek Matrixa.

LibreOffice je projekt skupnosti prostovoljcev, izjemno veseli bomo vaše pomoči.

Veselo preizkušanje!


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-27 Tuesday

21:00 UTC

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  • M&D left earlyish, with S&C&A&J leaving a little later; lovely to spend time with them all. Packed, tidied, set off to R&A's. Got there, fine dinner, played games.

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LibreOffice 7.5 will be released as final at the beginning of February, 2023 ( Check the Release Plan ) being LibreOffice 7.5 Release Candidate 1 (RC1) the third pre-release since the development of version 7.5 started in mid June, 2022. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.5 Beta1, 213 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 70 issues got fixed. Check the Release Notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 7.5 RC1 can be downloaded for Linux, macOS and Windows, and it will replace the standard version.

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email account in order to create a new account ).

For help, you can contact the QA Team directly in the QA IRC channel or via Matrix.

LibreOffice is a volunteer-driven community project, so please help us to test – we appreciate it!

Happy testing!!

Download it now!


Monday
26 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-26 Monday

21:00 UTC

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  • Boxing day, breakfast, B&A left earlyish. Out for a walk with the rest of the family along the nearby dyke. Back for a lateish lunch. Played games, watched Your Christmas or mine, did some sketching games, with J. & E. - worked on an tougher doughnut puzzle. Browsed food, chatted variously.

Sunday
25 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-25 Sunday

21:00 UTC

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  • Up at a reasonable time, E. up since six - stocking opening action. Breakfast, off to All Saints - H. played the organ, and I fiddled with the stops.
  • Home, S&C&A&J arrived snacks, then fine Christmas roast dinner, break for present opening before Christmas pudding & feast of deserts.

Saturday
24 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-24 Saturday

21:00 UTC

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  • Off into town to do some last minute shopping: located the elusive white toblerone for J. - back for lunch with B & A arriving.
  • H. played organ for the crib service.
  • Deep holiday mode, puzzling action with the family - a fine picture of York Minster & the shambles.

Friday
23 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-23 Friday

21:00 UTC

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  • Up earlyish, out for a run in the rain with J. Got to E-mail, while Dad watched Colin Furze - fun, welcomed Anna, marvelled at the nearly 90 QA position applicants we've had in under a week. H. over to Christina's.
  • Leo dropped by with cookies, Tessa's mum came over to pick her up, had a chat; Dinner. Neil around for a chat.

Thursday
22 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-22 Thursday

21:00 UTC

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  • Admin, mail, calls with Andras, sync with Noel, more admin, call with Lars too, review with Gokay - finally complete. Parents out to see Grant & Anne, Tessa around in the evening for a sleepover with N.

Wednesday
21 December, 2022


[it] LibreItalia: Buon Anno a Tutti

21:29 UTC

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[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-21 Wednesday

21:00 UTC

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  • Project planning much of the day; end of year All Hands call and summary at midday. Long planning call with Andras, and review. Parents arrived, catch up with them in the evening.

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En este momento existen dos puestos de desarrollador disponibles, uno tiene que ver con cuestiones de RTL/CTL y el otro se centra en la accesibilidad.

The Document Foundation (TDF) es la entidad sin fines de lucro que está detrás de …


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alsVarious data types are used in LibreOffice code and also in LibreOffice API. Here we discuss some of these data types, which are important when you are working with LibreOffice code and API.

You should know that LibreOffice API can be used from many languages, but here we only focus on C++. LibreOffice uses a component model called UNO (Universal Network Objects), which is designed to provide an environment for accessing network objects from different languages. The data types that we discuss here are among UNO data types.

UNO Data Types

The data types used in LibreOffice API are called UNO data types. They are also used extensively inside the LibreOffice code. Here we discuss the fundamental UNO data types.

Numerical/Character Data Types

First, let’s talk about simple UNO data types. If you take a look at the below table from the LibreOffice Developer’s Guide, chapter 1: First Steps you will see that it shows the numerical/character data types. When working with LibreOffice API, we do not simply use byte, short, long, int and other underlying C++ data types, but rather data types defined in LibreOffice. Those include sal_Int8, sal_Int16, sal_Int32 and their unsigned counterparts, sal_uInt8, sal_uInt16, sal_uInt32. In the past, sal_Bool was used for the boolean variables, but it is now deprecated and we simply use bool data type.

The table shows detailed information about these UNO data types, and how they are mapped into several programming languages:

Table 1: Mapping simple UNO data types to data types in different programming languages

UNO Type description Java C++ Basic
void empty type, used only as method return type and in any void void
boolean Boolean type; true and false boolean bool
(sal_Bool is deprecated)
Boolean
byte signed 8-bit integer type byte sal_Int8 Integer
short signed 16-bit integer type short sal_Int16 Integer
unsigned short unsigned 16-bit integer type (deprecated) sal_uInt16
long signed 32-bit integer type int sal_Int32 Long
unsigned long unsigned 32-bit integer type (deprecated) sal_uInt32
hyper signed 64-bit integer type long sal_Int64
unsigned hyper unsigned 64-bit integer type (deprecated) sal_uInt64
float IEC 60559 single precision floating point type float float (if appropriate) Single
double IEC 60559 double precision floating point type double double (if appropriate) Double
char 16-bit Unicode character type (more precisely: UTF-16 code units)- char sal_Unicode

Character and String Data Types

Another important data type is sal_Unicode, which is used instead of char for storing Unicode character data. In C/C++, for storing strings we use OUString which can store Unicode data. As DevGuide says, LibreOffice Basic strings are mapped to UNO strings transparently. So, you don’t have to worry about converting strings to OUStrings back and forth. But in C++, you have to do the conversion from other string types yourself. We will discuss strings in a separate blog post.

UNO Description Java C++ Basic
string Unicode string type (more precisely: strings of Unicode scalar values) java.lang.­String rtl::OUString String

Enums, Structs, Sequences and Any Data Types

In C


Tuesday
20 December, 2022


[en] Michael Meeks: 2022-12-20 Tuesday

21:00 UTC

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  • Sync with Kendy & estimation bits, worked on reviews until late, with more admin & misc. tasks.

Thursday
15 December, 2022


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LibreOffice 7.5 will be released as final at the beginning of February, 2023 ( Check the Release Plan ) being LibreOffice 7.5 Beta1 the second pre-release since the development of version 7.5 started in mid June, 2022. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.5 Alpha1, 353 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 116 issues got fixed. Check the Release Notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 7.5 Beta1 can be downloaded for Linux, MacOS and Windows, and it can be installed alongside the standard version.

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email account in order to create a new account ).

For help, you can contact the QA Team directly in the QA IRC channel or via Matrix.

LibreOffice is a volunteer-driven community project, so please help us to test – we appreciate it!

Happy testing!!

Download it now!


Friday
09 December, 2022


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General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 7.3.7 was released on November 3
  2. LibreOffice 7.4.3 was released on November 24
  3. Rafael Lima made many improvements to how LibreOffice looks like in dark mode, grammar mistake colour configurable, made it so Macro Selector dialog remembers the last run macro, made the new LanguageTool feature more user friendly and improved some UI strings. He also improved help for Database Wizard, ODBC connection and frequently-used buttons
  4. Adolfo Jayme Barrientos made many string fixes in help and in the UI code as well as dialog layout improvements
  5. Alain Romedenne made improvements and additions to macro help pages as well as the ones dealing with LibreOffice’s own file dialog and remote file services
  6. Olivier Hallot (TDF) continued with help screenshot cleanups and improved the help pages for Writer toolbars, slide/page formatting and preview pane, change tracking and array formulas
  7. Laurent Balland improved the documentation about templates in extras/README
  8. Stéphane Guillou (TDF) made some help fixes
  9. Bogdan Buzea made many string fixes in help and in the UI code. He also improved help page contents and corrected menu item paths
  10. Miklós Vajna (Collabora) continued working on Writer content controls, made it possible to customise PDF watermark formatting and rotation and added support for semi-transparent text in imported SVGs
  11. Jean-Pierre Ledure worked on the ScriptForge library
  12. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) fixed issues with embedded objects and images in PPTX and DOCX files and fixed a compatibility issue with artistic effects in DOCX files
  13. Szymon Kłos, Mert Tumer and Mike Kaganski (Collabora) worked on LOKit improvements. Szymon also fixed an issue with rendering embedded PDF files with large pages
  14. Ashod Nakashian (Collabora) added support for embedded videos when exporting presentations to SVG
  15. Henry Castro (Collabora) fixed issues with mail merge documents containing hidden sections
  16. Eike Rathke (Red Hat) fixed an ODF backwards compatibility issue with Calc headers and footers, fixed an issue with formula caches of multiple open Calc documents getting mixed up, made CSV data format detection more robust and fixed an issue with dates being imported incorrectly from Calc into Writer database fields. He also made some help fixes
  17. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) made many improvements to Writer accessibility checker
  18. Julien Nabet fixed a bunch of crashes and leaks and a problem with BMP export
  19. Jim Raykowski made many improvements to Writer’s Outline folding feature and the Navigator, including adding the ability to rename pages and objects in Draw/Impress directly in the Navigator and the ability to change the navigation order and grouping of objects by dragging and dropping
  20. Andreas Heinisch made window switching via VBA macros more robust and fixed an issue with selecting concordance files in the Table of Contents dialog
  21. László Németh improved native number formats, improved change tracking, fixed an issue with DOCX table formulas with comma delimiters and fixed an issue with extra lines in exported SVGs. He also fixed a couple of regressions
  22. Xisco Faulí (TDF) continued refactoring automated tests

Thursday
08 December, 2022


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Firebird high-level native client for Node.js / TypeScript status status for Firebird / Typescript Advent 2022https://qiita.com/advent-calendar/2022/firebirdTo use the driver you can start with the readme from npm/githubhttps://www.npmjs.com/package/node-firebird-driver-nativeA few more examples are in the packages/node-firebird-driver/src/test directoryWe have seen several releases with a few


Tuesday
06 December, 2022


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LibreOffice 7.5 will be released as final at the beginning of February, 2023 ( Check the Release Plan ) being LibreOffice 7.5 Alpha1 the first pre-release since the development of version 7.5 started in mid June, 2022. Since then, 4875 commits have been submitted to the code repository and more than 759 bugs were set to FIXED in Bugzilla. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 7.5 Alpha1 can be downloaded from here for Linux, MacOS and Windows, and it can be installed alongside the standard version.

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email account in order to create a new account ).

For help, you can contact the QA Team directly in the QA IRC channel or via Telegram.

LibreOffice is a volunteer-driven community project, so please help us to test – we appreciate it!

Happy testing!!

Download it now!


Monday
05 December, 2022


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The PDF export now supports various additional properties for the optional PDF watermark.

First, thanks Docmosis for funding this work by Collabora.

Motivation

Rendering of a PDF watermark with custom rotation and color

When you hear the word "watermark", you probably have something like the above picture in mind.

Instead, what the PDF export had is more like a proof of concept:

Rendering of a PDF watermark with default settings

The request was to add new options to control the font size, font name, rotation angle and color of the watermark, so in case an organization already has a given style of watermarks they prefer, our PDF export can be adapted accordingly.

Results so far

First, now you can specify a custom color, e.g. gray (#7f7f7f), using:

soffice --convert-to pdf:writer_pdf_Export:'{"Watermark":{"type":"string","value":"draft"}, "WatermarkColor":{"type":"long","value":"8355711"}}' test.odt

Rendering of a PDF watermark with custom color

Then you can also customize the font size, in case the automatic size would not fit your needs, using:

soffice --convert-to pdf:writer_pdf_Export:'{"Watermark":{"type":"string","value":"draft"}, "WatermarkFontHeight":{"type":"long","value":"100"}}' test.odt

Rendering of a PDF watermark with custom font size

Or perhaps you want a serif font, not a sans one:

soffice --convert-to pdf:writer_pdf_Export:'{"Watermark":{"type":"string","value":"draft"}, "WatermarkFontName":{"type":"string","value":"Times"}}' test.odt

Rendering of a PDF watermark with custom font name

Finally you can have a custom rotate angle:

soffice --convert-to pdf:writer_pdf_Export:'{"Watermark":{"type":"string","value":"draft"}, "WatermarkRotateAngle":{"type":"long","value":"450"}}' test.odt

Rendering of a PDF watermark with custom rotation

Using these building blocks, you can also build combinations, the first screenshot above was created using:

soffice --convert-to pdf:writer_pdf_Export:'{"Watermark":{"type":"string","value":"draft"}, "WatermarkRotateAngle":{"type":"long","value":"450"}, "WatermarkColor":{"type":"long","value":"8355711"}}' test.odt

i.e. the configuration JSON is:

{
    "Watermark": {
        "type": "string",
        "value": "draft"
    },
    "WatermarkRotateAngle": {
        "type": "long",
        "value": "450"
    },
    "WatermarkColor": {
        "type": "long",
        "value": "8355711"
    }
}

How is this implemented?

If you would like to know a bit more about how this works, continue reading... :-)

As usual, the high-level problem was addressed by a series of small changes:

Want to start using this?

You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office 22.05 and try it out yourself right now: try the unstable snapshot. Collabora intends to continue supporting and contributing to LibreOffice, the code is merged so we expect all of this work will be available in TDF's next release too (7.5).


Saturday
03 December, 2022


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node-firebird status for Firebird Advent 2022 https://qiita.com/advent-calendar/2022/firebird also for  Javascript Advent https://qiita.com/advent-calendar/2022/javascriptThis year we have seen several releases with a few features and changes :Version 1.1.0 Changes : Srp implementation by @maratth in #242Add optional callback for pool destroy by @Tomas2D in #244Set protocolVersion as optional in


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LibreOffice uses a build system called gbuild which uses GNU Make. Migrating from the old build system to gbuild started in the OpenOffice days, but the migration took a while and a lot of effort, finishing around LibreOffice 4.1.

This LibreOffice build system uses GNU Make, Perl and Python, so you need to have these prerequisites in order to be able to build LibreOffice. However, LibreOffice bundled Python can be used.

To get a nice description, just try this inside the LibreOffice core source folder:

make help

Structure of gbuild

You can find gbuild in solvenv/gbuild folder of the LibreOffice core source code. There are many macros available in gbuild that are useful when doing the actual build. Let’s start from a simple one that creates a nice output.

If you look at the build output, you see many three letter outputs. They are short forms denoting the category of what is being built, for example, [BIN] means binary, [MOD] means module, and [ALL] is what it is! There are other short names like [CXX] for compiling C++ files, [C ] for compiling C files, and [LNK] for the linking.

...
[BIN] postprocess
[MOD] postprocess
[MOD] libreoffice
[BIN] top level modules: libreoffice
[ALL] top level modules: build-non-l10n-only build-l10n-only
...

These are the outputs, generated by a macro named gb_Output_announce. This macro does the printing, and its code is available in “solenv/gbuild/Output.mk”

define gb_Output_announce
$(info $(call gb_Output_announce_str,$(1),$(2),$(3),$(4)))
endef

Then, it calls this macro:

$(call gb_Output_announce,$*.cxx,$(true),CXX,3)

And, you will see the nice result in the output which contains [CXX]. You can see that another macro, gb_Output_announce_str is called here, that creates the output.

Other gbuild Macro Examples

There are many other macros available for developers. You find the makefiles with the .mk extensions, and you see a lot of them for the executables, libraries, and tests.

For example, let’s take a look at the xmlscript folder. Here are the .mk files:

1) xmlscript/CppunitTest_xmlscript_cppunit.mk
2) xmlscript/Module_xmlscript.mk
3) xmlscript/Library_xmlscript.mk
4) xmlscript/Package_dtd.mk

The makefile #1 is the CppunitTest_xmlscript_cppunit, which is used for adding a test, which can be run by:

make CppunitTest_xmlscript_cppunit

The makefile #2 is the main makefile for the module, which in turn, invokes makefile #3, which builds the xmlscript library, and #4, which creates the xmlscript dtd package, and also makefile #1 which contains the tests. This code does the job:

$(eval $(call gb_Module_Module,xmlscript))

$(eval $(call gb_Module_add_targets,xmlscript,\
Library_xmlscript \
Package_dtd \
))

$(eval $(call gb_Module_add_check_targets,xmlscript,\
CppunitTest_xmlscript_cppunit \
))

As you can see, gb_Module_Module, gb_Module_add_targets and gb_Module_add_check_targets are the macros that are invoked to make this happen. All of these macros are defined in solenv/gbuild/Module.mk. In this file, you get this overview:

# Overview of dependencies and tasks of Module
#
# target                      task                         depends on
# Module                      build the product            all product targets
#                              excluding tests             recursive Modules
# Module/unitcheck            run unit tests               all unit tests
#                                                          recursive Module/checks
# Module/slowcheck            run all slow unit tests 

Tuesday
29 November, 2022


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Similar to the questionnaires about LibreOffice Draw (see first and second blog post) and LibreOffice Calc (see this post) we now run a survey on LibreOffice Impress to learn how the program is utilized, what features are used most frequently, and what users see as positive and negative and what they expect of the future.…


Friday
25 November, 2022


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LibreOffice Base can connect to an external Firebird server , here is an example with employee.fdb from Firebird 3 examples folder copied to c:\tmpTested with LibreOffice 7.4.x and Firebird 3 default install on Windows 11 (all 64 bits versions)and here is the Relation Design in LibreOffice Base


Thursday
24 November, 2022


[en] Caolán McNamara: macOS Dark Mode

15:39 UTC

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For LibreOffice 7.5 I've reworked the theming on macOS to get some support for Dark Mode, as seen above. As a side effect "accent colors" work in Light Mode too.


Thursday
17 November, 2022


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Do you want to submit a patch to LibreOffice Gerrit, and you’re wondering if your code will be accepted or not? Other than providing a good solution to resolve a problem (fix a bug, implement a feature or enhancement), you should care about the code conventions, and in particular, code formatting. Suitable code formatting for LibreOffice is what we discuss here.

Code Formatting Conventions

LibreOffice is based on the old code base of OpenOffice. Because of that, LibreOffice uses the coding conventions of OpenOffice in most places. There is a list of rules that you can refer to when needed, in the OpenOffice Wiki:

Here is a comprehensive list of C++ coding rules:

You can see many rules and standards there – beyond code formatting – from design to the way you should declare and implement classes, and their functions and variables. You will also find topics about how to create header files, how to document code and how to achieve type safety.

But, focusing only on C++ code formatting, you should make sure that:

  1. Each source file should have a suitable header. For the existing files, please keep the header as is.
  2. The source file should have a newline character in the end.
  3. It is suggested that you limit the code to only ASCII characters, and avoid using utf-8 string literals directly.
  4. Indent your code with 4 spaces
  5. You should avoid tabs.

These rules have their own name in the OpenOffice code formatting conventions.

Let’s look at this code snippet from a C++ file: chart2/qa/extras/charttest.hxx.

uno::Sequence < OUString > ChartTest::getImpressChartColumnDescriptions( std::u16string_view pDir, const char* pName )
{
    uno::Reference< chart::XChartDocument > xChartDoc = getChartDocFromImpress( pDir, pName );
    uno::Reference< chart::XChartDataArray > xChartData ( xChartDoc->getData(), uno::UNO_QUERY_THROW);
    uno::Sequence < OUString > seriesList = xChartData->getColumnDescriptions();
    return seriesList;
}

As you can see, in the old OpenOffice style, there is a space after the starting parenthesis (, and also before the ending parenthesis ). Also,  before and after <>. This might look old fashioned, but this is the way old code is written, and you are supposed to avoid changing the old code only for making it look better! I am going to describe why.

Why Keep Old Style Formatting?

There is a very good reason to keep the old style code formatting. To understand the code, and possible problems, developers usually refer to the code, and its history. Thus, it is important to keep the history of the code clean.

To achieve this, experienced developers suggest that you should avoid changing the formatting of the code, even if you are tempted to do so! Changing spacing, curly braces and other things in order to look nicer will pollute the git history.

The nice tool git blame can show who to blame for each line of code! If you change the code format randomly, you may prevent other developers to understand the root cause of the change, and thus fixing the problems more difficult.

What to Do With the New Files


Tuesday
15 November, 2022


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Designing with LibreOffice coverBruce Byfield and Jean Hollis Weber announce the second edition of Designing with LibreOffice. The book is available as an .ODT or .PDF file under the Creative Commons Attribution/Sharealike License version 4.0 or later from https://designingwithlibreoffice.com/

The first edition was published in 2016, and was downloaded over thirty-five thousand times. Michael Meeks, one of the co-founders of LibreOffice, described the first edition as “an outstanding contribution to help people bring the full power of LibreOffice into their document.” Similarly, free software author and journalist Carla Schroder wrote, “Designing With LibreOffice teaches everything you need to know about document production…. suitable for beginners to wizened old pros, who will probably discover things about LibreOffice that they didn’t know.”

The second edition updates the original, removing outdated information and adding updated screenshots and new information about topics such as Harfbuzz font shaping codes, export to EPUB formats for ereaders, the Zotero extension for bibliographies, and Angry Reviewer, a Grammarly-like extension for editing diction. In the future, the writers plan to release other editions as necessary to keep Designing with LibreOffice current.

For more information or interviews, contact Bruce Byfield at bbyfield@axion.net.


Thursday
10 November, 2022


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General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 7.4.2 was released on October 13
  2. Rafael Lima made many improvements to how LibreOffice looks like in dark mode under Linux and Windows, cleaned up template categories that show up in Template Manager, fixed an issue with InsertText example Python macro, improved the layout of Calc’s Functions sidebar panel and improved some strings appearing in the UI. He also added a help page for chart data tables and improved the help for ImageMaps and Writer table formulas
  3. Adolfo Jayme Barrientos made some string fixes in help and in the UI code
  4. Alain Romedenne made improvements and additions to macro help pages
  5. Olivier Hallot (TDF) made large-scale cleanups regarding screenshots in help, improved help related to file properties, conditional formatting in Calc and layers in Draw
  6. Laurent Balland converted all wizard templates to XML, making them easier to maintain. He also simplified the makefiles of Writer, Impress and Draw templates
  7. Miklós Vajna (Collabora) added support for titles and tags in Writer content controls, made SVG export preserve tab characters, fixed losing preview images of embedded PDF objects, improved handling of bookmarks and images in Writer header/footer, fixed losing CDATA markup in Writer html import and improved handling of numbering portion formatting in Writer
  8. Jean-Pierre Ledure worked on the ScriptForge library
  9. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) fixed an issue with embedded PPTX files displayed with incorrect zoom
  10. Szymon Kłos, Ashod Nakashian, Mike Kaganski and Henry Castro (Collabora) worked on LOKit improvements
  11. Eike Rathke (Red Hat) improved how language scripts are mapped to language tags, made CSV/TSV clipboard import into Calc more robust, fixed rounding issues with time differences and dates in Calc and made Calc’s date acceptance pattern handling more robust. He also improved the help page for Find and Replace
  12. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) did a lot of refactoring in Writer code
  13. Julien Nabet fixed a crash in Report Designer
  14. Jim Raykowski made many improvements to Writer’s Outline folding feature and the Navigator, including allowing multiple selections in Draw’s Navigator
  15. Andreas Heinisch made it possible to edit a Writer index entry by double-clicking on it, made it so form components requiring input no longer add an empty item, fixed an issue with row height changes causing loss of Calc autofilter results (with Eike Rathke’s help), fixed a UI update issue in Writer’s cross-reference dialog, made autofilter more robust regarding Unicode strings and made it so missing optional parameters in Basic return an error code instead of a boolean
  16. László Németh fixed superscript footnote numbering in non-English locales in DOCX files, fixed several issues with nested tables and made Writer spellchecking updates trigger more intuitively
  17. Xisco Faulí (TDF) made massive refactorings to automated tests, greatly simplifying test code. He also fixed many crashes, improved the crash reporter and added some automated tests
  18. Heiko Tietze (TDF) removed the option “Use printer metrics”
  19. Michael Stahl (allotropia) improved the compliance of exported PDFs with Universal Accessibility standard and fixed

Friday
04 November, 2022


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The Talks and Slides by Collaboran’s at the LibreOffice Conference 2022

The LibreOffice Conference 2022 (LibOCon) took place from September 28 to October 1 in Milan. It was the first LibreOffice Conference since the outbreak of the COVID-19 Pandemic that took place as an in-person event. Collabora was one of the sponsors, and a significant number of our developers contributed talks on various aspects of LibreOffice technology. Did you miss any of those? Don’t worry! All our talks are available for you on YouTube inside our LibOCon playlist. Please also feel free to download the slides we included in this blog post.

Keynotes and Advocating

Michael Meeks: Sponsor Keynote Collabora

Michael Meeks, Managing Director of Collabora Productivity, takes a look at the latest developments in LibreOffice from an organisational and ecosystem perspective. See details

Watch the talk
Download the slides

Michael Meeks: The ongoing story of Online

Hear Michael Meeks tell the history of LibreOffice in the browser. From it’s pre-historic past as StarPortal, through gtk-broadway prototypes, to Collabora Online as we know it today. See details

Watch the talk
Download the slides

Technical Talks

Sarper Akdemir: Chasing an Interoperability Bug in Impress

During the Quality Assurance track, Sarper Akdemir explained how to fix an interoperability bug by showcasing the whole process of understanding, fixing, and implementing tests. See details

Watch the talk
Download the slides

Tomaž Vajngerl: Sparklines and Chart Data Tables – New Features in Calc

Sparklines are mini charts, that are drawn into a cell. In his talk, senior software engineer Tomaž Vajngerl presented the features and the challenges during the development. See details

Watch the talk
Download the slides

Miklos Vajna : Content Controls in Writer

While LibreOffice and Collabora Office were already capable of filling forms via form controls or form fields, they can now also fully represent content controls. In this talk by Senior Software Engineer Miklos Vajna, see how this work was implemented! See details

Watch the talk
Download the slides

Follow Collabora


Collabora Productivity created Collabora Online, a powerful online office suite, which you can integrate into your own infrastructure. It prioritises your digital sovereignty and provides you with all the tools to keep your data secure, without compromising on features. Collabora provides a wide range of products, as well as consulting services for enterprises and governments. Powered by the largest team of certified LibreOffice engineers in the world, Collabora is a leading contributor to the LibreOffice Technology codebase and community. Collabora Office for Desktop and Collabora Online provide a business-hardened office suite with long-term support. Collabora’s multi-platform policy is completed with Collabora Office for iOS, Android, and Chrome OS. Collabora Productivity is a division of Collabora, the global software consultancy dedicated to providing the benefits Open Source to the commercial world, specializing in mobile, automotive and consumer electronics industries. For more information, follow us  on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube.

 

 

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