The Document Foundation Planet

 

March 27, 2020

Tamas Zolnai

New integration test framework in Collabora Online.

Introduction

At Collabora, we invest a lot of hard work to make LibreOffice's features available in an online environment. Recently we greatly improved the Collabora Online mobile UI, so it's more smooth to use it from a mobile device. While putting more and more work into the software, trying to support more and more different platforms, we need also to spend time improving the test frameworks we use for automatic testing. These test frameworks make sure that while we enrich the software with new features, the software remains stable during the continuous development process.

End-to-end testing in the browser

One step on this road was the integration of cypress.io test framework into Collabora Online code. cypress.io is an end-to-end test run in the browser, so any online application can be tested with it. It mainly allows us to simulate user interaction with the UI and check the event's results via the website's DOM elements. That allows us to simulate user stories and catch real-life issues in the software, so our quality measurement matches the actual user experience.

When I investigated the different alternatives for browser testing I also checked the Selenium test framework. I didn't spend more than two days on that, but I had an impression that Selenium is kind of "old" software, which tries to support many configurations, many language bindings which makes it hard to use and also makes it stuck in the current state, where it is. While cypress.io is a newer test framework, which seems more focused. It is easier to integrate into our build system and easier to use, which is a big plus because it's not enough to integrate a test framework, but developers need to learn how to use it too. I saw one advantage of Selenium: the better browser support. It supports all the main browsers (Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer), while cypress.io mainly supports only Chrome, but it improves on this area. Now it has a beta Mozilla Firefox support. So finally I decided to use cypress.io and I'm happy I did that because it nicely works.

cypress.io in Collabora Online

So cypress.io is now integrated into the Collabora Online code and we already have 150 tests mainly for mobile UI. As we submit most of our work to upstream, these tests are also available in the community version of the software. It's integrated into the software's GNU make based build system, so a make check will run these tests automatically. This is also part of the continuous integration system, so we can catch any regression instantly, before it actually hits the code. It's recommended to all developers of the online code to get familiar with the test framework, so it will be easier to understand if a test failure indicates an issue in their proposed patch. There are a set of useful notes in the source code, in the readme file: [source_dir]/cypress_test/README. Next to that, I try to add some good advice in the following paragraphs, how to investigate if any cypress test is failing on your patch.

How to check a test failure?


Interactive test runner

When you run make check the cypress tests are run in headless mode, so you can't see what happens on the UI, while the tests are running. If you see a test failure, the easiest way to understand what happens is to check it in the interactive test runner. To do that you can call make run-mobile or make run-desktop depending on what kind of test you are interested in. In interactive mode, you'll get a window, where you can select a test suite (*_spec.js file) and run that test suite only.

After you select a test suite you'll see the tests running in the browser. It's fast so probably you can't follow all the steps, but after the tests are finished you can select the steps and check screenshot for every step, so you can follow the state of the application. This way you can see how the application gets to a failure state.

Can't reproduce a failure in the interactive test runner

Sometimes, it happens that a test failure is reproducible only in headless mode. There are more options, that you can do in this case. First, you can check a screenshot taken at the point when the test failed. This screenshot is added automatically into a separate folder:

[source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress/screenshots/

This screenshot shows only the failure state, which might not be enough. You can also use the cypress command log to write out important information into the console during a test run. You can do that using the cy.log() method, called from the JS test code (this is not equivalent to console.log() method). In the case of test failure, these logs are dumped on the console output. These logs are also available here:

[source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress/logs/

A third option is to enable video recording. With video recording, the cypress test framework will generate a video of the test run, where you can see the same thing that you would see in the interactive test runner. To enable video recording you need to remove "video" : false, line from [source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress.json file. After that, running make check will record videos for all test suites you are running and put them under videos folder:

[source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress/videos/

How to run only one test?

To run one test suite you can use the spec option:

make check-mobile spec=writer/apply_font_spec.js

This spec option can be used with check-mobile and check-desktop rules, depending on what kind of test you intend to run. This is the headless run, but in the interactive test runner, you also can do that by selecting one test suite from the list. With these options, you can run a test suite, but a test suite means more tests. If you would like to run only one test you need to combine a test suite run, with using only() method. You need to open the test suite file and add only() to the definition of the specific test case:

- it('Apply font name.', function() {
+ it.only('Apply font name.', function() {

So both the headless build and the interactive test runner will ignore any other tests in the same test suite. It's useful when somebody investigates why a specific test fails.

Summary

So that's it for now. I hope these pieces of information are useful for getting familiar with the new test framework. Fortunately, the cypress.io test framework provides us nice tools to write new tests and check test failures. I'm still working on the test framework to customize it to our online environment. Hopefully, using this test framework will improve software quality in the long term.

by Tamás Zolnai (noreply@blogger.com) at March 27, 2020 09:39 AM

March 25, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-03-25 Wednesday.

  • Mail chew, S&M call, partner call.
  • Really pleased to see Collabora Office 4.2.1 for Android out - with a lot of rather important fixes, performance improvements, UI pretifications and much more.

March 25, 2020 03:20 PM

Official TDF Blog

Document Freedom Day 2020

Document Freedom is based on Open Formats, such as ODF or Open Document Format, the ISO standard native file format of LibreOffice and other FOSS office suites.

What is an Open Format?

When you save a document on your computer, it is stored in a computer file. Whether it is a text file, a picture, a video or any other kind of work, it is saved with a specific coded structure, known as the file format.

To be able to share data, software programs must be able to communicate with each other. It implies that no barrier whatsoever may hinder the exchange of data and the related write or read operations. For such a seamless exchange to be possible, software programs are required to be “interoperable”.

Interoperability is guaranteed when it relies on open standards, i.e. public technical specifications, freely usable by everyone, without restriction nor compensation, and maintained by an open decision-making process. File formats based on these open standards are “Open Formats”.

Where software interoperability is set aside, or if a program editor does not give access to the key information for interoperability or if the file design recipe is kept undisclosed, or if the file design recipe is available but is not followed by the program, file formats are considered to be “closed” and do not allow interoperability. For a software user, choosing between an Open File Format or a closed one has a deep impact on the ownership of and the access to his/her own data and their availability over time.

What are the benefits of Open Formats?

  • Open Format documents are readable and writable, by oneself or by third parties.
  • Open Format document readability is guaranteed over time as the format evolves without disruptions.
  • Open Formats have the advantage of being freely usable by many software programs, enabling interoperability.
  • Open Formats support freedom of choice as they do not promote any company’s specific format. They help avoid the monopolistic position of software editors who aim at locking users through their own proprietary formats.

Free Software and open formats, the perfect duo!

Free Software are programs that offer four freedoms to users: the liberty to copy and to distribute the software to others, the right to use it for every kind of use, the right to study it in order to know its functioning, and the right to modify in order to improve it. Free Software designers usually favour existing Open Formats, and contribute to their evolution.

Furthemore, as Free Software developers publish their source code (the software design recipe), recording methods and format descriptions used are de facto distributed with the software.

Open Formats and Free Software share the same goals: to be at the service of eveyone and to ensure users the full ownership and control over their data as well as perennial availability of those data.

Let’s celebrate Document Freedom Day 2020 by sharing with other people the information about the importance of Open Formats. Create your own DFD Dove.

[This text is almost entirely based on a document developed by April (https://www.april.org/en) for a previous Document Freedom Day, and released under Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 2.0 License]

by Italo Vignoli at March 25, 2020 01:06 AM

March 24, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-03-24 Tuesday.

  • Mail, call with Mike, some hacking; tech team call. Dug into unit tests, pwrt. parallelizing them. Movie in the evening.

March 24, 2020 09:00 PM

Official TDF Blog

LibreOffice: A great choice for schools and education

Many schools, colleges and universities around the world use LibreOffice to get their work done every day. The free and open source office suite, compatible with Microsoft Office and a successor to OpenOffice(.org) with many extra features, includes a complete set of powerful tools for students and teachers:

  • Writer – word processor
  • Calc – spreadsheet
  • Impress – presentation tool
  • Draw – for technical drawings, brochures etc.
  • Math – formula editor
  • Base – database

Benefits in education

Because LibreOffice is free and open source software, students and teachers can download and install it on as many machines as they like, without worrying about license fees, subscriptions or audits. If you’re a teacher, you can be sure that your students won’t suddenly be locked out of their documents for not renewing a subscription. They can keep working, as long as they like!

As well as the desktop app, there’s also LibreOffice Online, a cloud-based version of the suite that students can access via their web browsers. You can set up LibreOffice Online on your own infrastructure, with help from professional support services.

Additionally, LibreOffice is backed up by a rich ecosystem, with many companies and resources available to help users:

One more benefit, especially for IT students and teachers: because LibreOffice is open source, anyone can study how it works and make improvements. See what you can do for LibreOffice here!

Give it a try – download LibreOffice for Windows, macOS and Linux

by Mike Saunders at March 24, 2020 09:39 AM

Paint a Dove for Document Freedom Day

 

Help us celebrate the Twelfth Anniversary of Document Freedom Day by making a paper dove!

Download the dove template and the instructions from this link: https://tdf.io/dfd1, and once you are done with your dove take a picture of it and upload your photo using this link: https://tdf.io/dfd2.

#DFDDove2020 #DFD2020

by Italo Vignoli at March 24, 2020 12:12 AM

March 23, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-03-23 Monday.

  • Mail chew; planning call; more various admin. Lunch with the kids - all studying studiously up-stairs; nice. Back to some development.

March 23, 2020 09:00 PM

March 22, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-03-22 Sunday.

  • Feeling rather unwell; up early, helped J. who despite her consumptive cough, tidied up in the garden a little. Sang a bit with the babes & enjoyed a talk from All Souls.
  • Pizza lunch; out for a walk on the gallops together - ~no-one there. Slept exhaustedly in the afternoon. Watched Point Break with the babes.

March 22, 2020 09:00 PM

March 21, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-03-21 Saturday.

  • Cleaned a ton of dust out of my office - helped J' get the garden tidied up, bought trampoline parts. Watched Jabberwocky with the family.
  • Managed to get my PHP hack working in the evening.

March 21, 2020 09:00 PM

March 20, 2020

Andreas Kainz

Icon gallery

I submit a new gallery for LibreOffice called Icons. It show some usefull icons/symbols which can be used in all LibreOffice apps. If you search for app icons they area already available in the GUI widget prototyping extension.

Please test the extension and give me feedback.

by kdeonlinux at March 20, 2020 11:47 PM

Arrows gallery

For the LibreOffice 7.0 release I work on galleries. One which is ready for testers is a new/updated arrows gallery.

You can test the arrow gallery by install the extension (upload to the extension page was done. Pending for the review.)

by kdeonlinux at March 20, 2020 11:21 PM

March 19, 2020

Official TDF Blog

LibreOffice 6.4.2 available for download

Berlin, March 19, 2020 – The Document Foundation announces the availability of LibreOffice 6.4.2, the 2nd minor release of the LibreOffice 6.4 family, targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users. LibreOffice 6.4.2 includes several bug fixes and improvements to document compatibility.

Mac users will be happy to know that the issue of blurry fonts on Retina displays has been resolved.

LibreOffice 6.4.2 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is not optimized for enterprise class deployments, where features are less important than robustness. Users wanting a more mature version can download LibreOffice 6.3.5, which includes some months of back-ported fixes.

LibreOffice 6.4.2’s change log pages are available on TDF’s wiki: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.4.2/RC1 (changed in RC1) and https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.4.2/RC2 (changed in RC2).

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

LibreOffice in business

For enterprise class deployments, TDF strongly recommend sourcing LibreOffice from one of the ecosystem partners to get long-term supported releases, dedicated assistance, custom new features and other benefits, including Service Level Agreements (SLAs). Also, the work done by ecosystem partners flows back into the LibreOffice project, benefiting everyone.

Also, support for migrations and trainings should be sourced from certified professionals who provide value-added services which extend the reach of the community to the corporate world and offer CIOs and IT managers a solution in line with proprietary offerings.

In fact, LibreOffice – thanks to its mature codebase, rich feature set, strong support for open standards, excellent compatibility and long-term support options from certified partners – represents the ideal solution for businesses that want to regain control of their data and free themselves from vendor lock-in.

Availability of LibreOffice 6.4.2

LibreOffice 6.4.2 is immediately available from the following link: https://www.libreoffice.org/download/. Minimum requirements are specified on the download page. TDF builds of the latest LibreOffice Online source code are available as Docker images: https://hub.docker.com/r/libreoffice/online/.

LibreOffice Online is fundamentally a server-based platform, and should be installed and configured by adding cloud storage and an SSL certificate. It might be considered an enabling technology for the cloud services offered by ISPs or the private cloud of enterprises and large organizations.

All versions of LibreOffice are built with document conversion libraries from the Document Liberation Project: https://www.documentliberation.org.

Support LibreOffice

LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://ask.libreoffice.org, where they can get and provide user-to-user support. People willing to contribute their time and professional skills to the project can visit the dedicated website at https://whatcanidoforlibreoffice.org.

LibreOffice users, free software advocates and community members can provide financial support to The Document Foundation with a donation via PayPal, credit card or other tools at https://www.libreoffice.org/donate.

by Italo Vignoli at March 19, 2020 12:30 PM

March 17, 2020

Official TDF Blog

Document Freedom in 2020

In the age of the cloud, most people think they don’t have “real” files any more, as these have been replaced by pointers in an online system. They don’t realise they have lost their freedom until they download the file to edit it on their laptop. At that point, they realize that without buying a proprietary office suite they are unable to access their very own contents, as these are hostage of a proprietary file format. Something that wouln’t have happened if they had chosen the standard Open Document Format (ODF), which can be fully implemented by any software vendor without special permission, and without having to reverse engineer an obfuscated pseudo-standard format owned by a single company.

Back in 2012, European Commission Vice President Neelie Kroes said: “Open standards create competition, lead to innovation, and save money,” while announcing the publication of a new policy to help public authorities avoid dependence on a single ICT supplier. At the time, following the recommendations of the new approach against lock-in could save the EU’s public sector more than € 1.1 billion a year.

Working with open standards – rather than specifying a single ICT brand, tool, system, or product – when procuring ICT systems could save taxpayers’ money. However, many organisations were either lacking the expertise to decide which standards are relevant to their ICT needs, or fearing that the initial costs of change would be too costly and might lead to loss of data. As a result, after eight years they still remain locked into their ICT systems or into a relationship with only one provider. How much are we globally losing – in term of end user or taxpayer money – by sticking to the insane decision of using proprietary or pseudo-standard document formats?

Open Document Format is a well designed and flexible open document standard format to store information in a future proof and portable way. Probably its best feature for regular users is that they won’t really notice they are using it, as things just work as expected independently from the specific product used to create the original document. Contents are preserved, and the document has the same visual look even when accessed with a different software running on a different operating system, as with ODF the way you store documents is not related to the software you work with. ODF files are platform independent and do not rely on any specific piece of software whatsoever.

Open Document Format does have a number of obvious advantages which make it unique:

  • ODF documents are smaller in size than their legacy and proprietary equivalents, because they are structurally simpler, and as such are more robust
  • Content as well as media objects (images, movies, etc) are directly accessible and easy to work with from outside the office application, even for non technical users
  • The simple XML syntax is human readable and easy to understand, and this allows to easily recover documents by unzipping the file and access the content directly
  • ODF is more secure, as the light-weight structure makes it easier than ever to enforce even the strictest security policies
  • ODF reuses a large number of existing standards whereever possible, and this makes the standard smaller, more robust, easier and cheaper to implement and support
  • Smart technical users can easily add machine processable data to the content of the document, to create “smart documents” with can be populated automatically
  • The well-defined and concise OpenFormula standard for spreadsheet formulas gets rid of legacy bugs known to spreadsheets, including the 43 year old leap year bug

Key benefits for enterprises and government bodies include:

  • ODF is an open and durable standard, and as such can ensure that a document saved today will not be technologically locked or abandoned tomorrow, and it will be always possible to access contents independently from any vendors’ commercial strategies
  • ODF keeps contents (information) separated from the application used to develop it, so that any document can be processed by any applications seamlessly and with fidelity, without interference of any proprietary code or any other restrictions
  • Because ODF is a truly open standard, it levels the playing field for multiple software providers to compete on functionality and price, and provides greater choice due to competition among vendors, including both proprietary and open source applications
  • ODF provides a platform-independent format on which any company can build and distribute new applications and services, while ensuring that documents will remain accessible even after innovations have been added thanks to the base-line open standard
  • ODF is the only open, XML-based document file format currently on the market that satisfies the basic need of enterprises and governments to access documents of potential historical
    significance, created and stored in digital form, not only today but also for future generations
  • The adoption of ODF is also compelling in the context of emergency situations, to guarantee the possibility of accessing and sharing information essential to the relief efforts without having to worry about the characteristics of the original document

To learn about ODF, you can start from Wikipedia, or read the white paper Open by Design, The Advantages of the OpenDocument Format (ODF), by the OASIS ODF Adoption TC (now replaced by the ODF Advocacy Open Project at OASIS). Here you can find other documents about ODF and its advantages: Open Forum Europe – Dual Standards More Choice or LessItalo Vignoli – Keep it Open, and a comprehensive slide deck about Open Document Format.

The Cabinet Office of the UK Government, who has decided to adopt ODF as the reference standard for all documents, has published an interesting Policy Paper on Open Standard Principles and a Guidance on Using Open Document Formats (ODF) in your organisation, which provide an interesting point of view about the specific advantages of open standards and ODF for governments.

In a week from now, on March 25, we will celebrate the Document Freedom Day, to educate organizations and users about the importance of adopting an open document standard to get back the full ownership of documents and contents that they have developed, and then have – often unconsciously – left in the hands of a proprietary software vendor. This, independently from the fact that documents are in the cloud or on their local hard disk.

In the next few days, we will publish some images for all of us to share on blog posts and social media on March 25. Stay tuned!

by Italo Vignoli at March 17, 2020 11:42 AM

March 10, 2020

Miklos Vajna

My hack week at Collabora: (start of) padded numbering in Writer

As mentioned in a previous such report, a hack week is when we are allowed to hack on anything we want in LibreOffice for a few days at Collabora. I used this time to implement core support for padded numbering in Writer.

Motivation

Padded numbering is a style where you insert 0 characters in front of an otherwise normal (Arabic) numbering, making sure that the result always has at least N characters. Up to now, you had to number your content manually to have this effect, while Word supports this feature.

OOXML supports padding up to 2, 3, 4 and 5 characters. Padding up to 2 characters is the older feature, supported in DOC and RTF as well, so I focused on that piece.

Results so far

Here is how the current, the baseline and the reference rendering of padded numbering looks like:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/n-XvNw0xPkBK_u9eqVraa7meGxYPX8dpKtfmHkN54y60x5HvUhQBouGEnfLX3XjzQFDjG7oWhCGVvFLnINneGZwDIjB8FW1hgwYSEpWrt3kniLGeKNFAfpa_Y9NGHNadj50ecy3FVw=s300-p-k
Figure 1. numbering-padded2.docx, current
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/BgSZhU4WNkwTvOejqbfaKSiEQUudnDCUeVaQ62xPETwzhP0-FUPsBZMrUrgwhfi3fSou3YIQ_Yb0tuDzJmeIxHk2LhOpS9ENvxwLCr3-aCn4rIS0e9vYOh2__cHAvP82-MUJzQS-Zg=s300-p-k
Figure 2. numbering-padded2.docx, baseline
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/TXI-klcS5xzPUX0SaV_iqhweMcUX0aN1rc7rwwAbKdulmPYZ6wcYqcQTO94aHGZl_p4FuVSt_drCI1blKRHLupNjC6j08GjdppbkJ8o72xNmjpV_X2_LcPUgZmOfGBeUJRhDKptxqg=s300-p-k
Figure 3. numbering-padded2.docx, reference

You can see how 0 is inserted before 1..9, but not before 10.

How is this implemented?

If you would like to know a bit more about how this works, continue reading… :-)

Then I found that footnote numbering needs explicit handling, so added support for padding in that case as well:

Finally I had a little bit of remaining time, so I extended support for the recently added Chicago numbering:

Future work

Padding up to 3, 4 and 5 characters would be possible to do, but it’s DOCX-only, and uses a different markup, planned to be done later.

All this is available in master (towards LibreOffice 7.0), so you can grab a daily build and try it out right now. :-)

by Miklos Vajna at March 10, 2020 08:43 AM

March 09, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: February 2020

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.3.5 was announced on February, 20
  2. LibreOffice 6.4.1 was announced on February, 27
  3. LibreOffice was present at FOSDEM and many presentations about LibreOffice were given on February, 1
  4. A 2 days Hackfest took place in Brussels right after FOSDEM
  5. Michael Weghorn implemented native PopupMenus for the qt5/kf5 VCL plugin
  6. Stephan Bergmann (Red Hat) fixed blurry text in macOS and did many code cleanups
  7. Jim Raykowski continued to improve Navigator in general and its context menu
  8. Seth Chaiklin made many Help update patches
  9. Luboš Luňák (Collabora) continues to polish Skia library in LibreOffice
  10. Maxim Monastirsky added Highlighting tab for shapes and comments to Format>Character dialog in Writer and in Calc
  11. Noel Grandin (Collabora) did many cleanups under the hood, including changes that speed up development
  12. Jan Holešovský (Collabora) enabled spell-checking on Android
  13. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) continued the crucial user interface backend work and also did many cleanups to the code
  14. Mike Kaganski (Collabora) made it so decimals input into Calc are represented with the correct precision value
  15. Michael Stahl (CIB) improved DOCX exporting of footnote separators and rotated text fields
  16. Jan-Marek Glogowski (CIB) fixed several qt5/kf5 issues
  17. Xisco Fauli (TDF) added basic unittests for LWP files
  18. Gábor Kelemen (NISZ) fixed issues with missing titles and period separators in charts
  19. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) improved label placement for stacked area charts and fixed XLSX exporting of chart line markers
  20. Bakos Attila (NISZ) fixed chart wrap setting with DOCX import and shape anchoring to table with DOCX export
  21. László Németh (NISZ) fixed several issues with tables in imported DOCX files
  22. Szabolcs Tóth (NISZ) fixed inherited list level of custom styles with DOCX import
  23. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed several issues with chart label positioning with OOXML import and export
  24. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) fixed several DOCX import and export issues and implemented semi-transparent text for Writer
  25. Eike Rathke (Red Hat) improved handling of named references in Calc
  26. Julien Nabet fixed the precision and scale for decimal and numeric fields in Firebird databases
  27. Armin Le Grand improved the performance of rendering dashed lines
  28. Arnaud Versini added minimum support for PDF/A3
  29. Serge Krot (CIB) fixed DOCX exporting of bold text under certain conditions
  30. Andreas Kainz made many UI improvements in Sidebar
  31. Rizal Muttaqin made many improvements in most of the icon themes
  32. Heiko Tietze (TDF) added a note in the UI for Draw page renaming conflicts
  33. Jens Carl moved several Java tests to C++

Reported Bugs

679 bugs, 98 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 442 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 32 )
  2. sdc.blanco ( 22 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 21 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 16 )
  5. Mike Kaganski ( 13 )
  6. Rizal Muttaqin ( 13 )
  7. Robert Großkopf ( 9 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 9 )
  9. stdedos ( 8 )
  10. Timur ( 7 )

Triaged Bugs

668 bugs have been triaged by 95 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 159 )
  2. Dieter ( 83 )
  3. Julien Nabet ( 51 )
  4. Heiko Tietze ( 47 )
  5. Oliver Brinzing ( 25 )
  6. Aron Budea ( 22 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 22 )
  8. raal ( 18 )
  9. eisa01 ( 14 )
  10. Alex Thurgood ( 11 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

578 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

242 bugs have been fixed by 54 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. Caolán McNamara ( 32 )
  2. Noel Grandin ( 10 )
  3. Jan-Marek Glogowski ( 9 )
  4. László Németh ( 8 )
  5. Michael Weghorn ( 8 )
  6. Seth Chaiklin ( 8 )
  7. Miklos Vajna ( 7 )
  8. Eike Rathke ( 7 )
  9. Balazs Varga ( 6 )
  10. Samuel Mehrbrodt ( 6 )

List of critical bugs fixed

  1. tdf#122218 After Update to 6.1.4 on macOS fonts are blurred on retina display (xcode 10) ( Thanks to Christian Lohmaier )
  2. tdf#130482 Can’t align text in a textbox ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  3. tdf#130614 Crash in: SfxItemPool::IsInRange(unsigned short) ( Thanks to Xisco Faulí )
  4. tdf#130959 LibreOffice crashes when opening files with non-existing hyperlinks ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#128873 Calc – long time to open file in 6.4 beta ( Thanks to Serge Krot )
  2. tdf#129529 Cannot open 819-pages ODT ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  3. tdf#129912 Cannot open DOC – regression ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  4. tdf#130373 Since update, substitute color only works if left set to transparent. ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  5. tdf#130483 Crash on pasting a table from Writer ( Thanks to Mark Hung )
  6. tdf#130623 Base: Empty Field Properties (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  7. tdf#130760 Impress crashes on broken hyperlink click ( Thanks to Samuel Mehrbrodt )
  8. tdf#130794 kf5: Keyboard input ignored ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  9. tdf#130809 File dialogs in Mac OS are in German ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  10. tdf#130878 Report does not show label-fields when run in 7.0 ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  11. tdf#130917 FILESAVE DOCX Signature line export creates invalid document ( Thanks to Samuel Mehrbrodt )
  12. tdf#130951 FILEOPEN: DOCX: picture does not display doc saved by MSWord ( Thanks to Armin Le Grand )
  13. tdf#130960 edit / track changes / compare documents does not work ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  14. tdf#91219 FILESAVE: Crash when anchoring a shape with a textbox to a frame that is anchored to that shape ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#127205 Crash when terminating the StarDesktop from running a document macro ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  2. tdf#129809 LibreOffice Writer crash while moving one letter with hyperlink (gtk3/kf5) ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  3. tdf#130274 TRACK CHANGES: Crash in swlo.dll with track changes enabled and AutoCorrect ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  4. tdf#130340 cmd + space = crashes reliably for keymap window ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  5. tdf#130414 Crash when setting window position via API (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#130483 Crash on pasting a table from Writer ( Thanks to Mark Hung )
  7. tdf#130499 kf5: Crash when closing Writer after D’n’D of text ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  8. tdf#130513 CRASH: Writer crashes changing UI to notebookbar (win) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  9. tdf#130541 Crash after changing text type property of a text box control ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  10. tdf#130555 Crash when clearing the ‘Find’ text field ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  11. tdf#130614 Crash in: SfxItemPool::IsInRange(unsigned short) ( Thanks to Xisco Faulí )
  12. tdf#130658 Crash on adding word to User-defined dictionary (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  13. tdf#130756 CRASH: traversing tabs with Ctrl+PageUp/Down (gen) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  14. tdf#130760 Impress crashes on broken hyperlink click ( Thanks to Samuel Mehrbrodt )
  15. tdf#130831 CRASH when displaying a dialog containing a checkbox ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  16. tdf#130922 CRASH: Moving backwards in Paste Table wizard (gen) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  17. tdf#130952 CRASH: launching Bullets & Numbering dialog from sidebar (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  18. tdf#130959 LibreOffice crashes when opening files with non-existing hyperlinks ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  19. tdf#91219 FILESAVE: Crash when anchoring a shape with a textbox to a frame that is anchored to that shape ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#128873 Calc – long time to open file in 6.4 beta ( Thanks to Serge Krot )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#42695 [UI] When Navigator is docked, new documents show an inactive “List Box”. When Navigator is undocked and “List Box” is turned “Off” then no items are shown when Navigator is docked again ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  2. tdf#57307 Basic IDE: adding variable to Watch window performs incorrectly if variable name contains_underscores ( Thanks to Andreas Heinisch )
  3. tdf#57879 EDITING : consider an underscore to be part of a string ( Thanks to Andreas Heinisch )
  4. tdf#84553 Detect and warn of Windows Antivirus in configure … ( Thanks to Michel Thomas )
  5. tdf#90749 support leader lines for data labels ( Thanks to Balazs Varga )
  6. tdf#91219 FILESAVE: Crash when anchoring a shape with a textbox to a frame that is anchored to that shape ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  7. tdf#92472 FILEOPEN: First legacy checkbox in row has too large dimensions on docx import ( Thanks to László Németh )
  8. tdf#92484 UI: lock toolbar by default ( Thanks to A_GAN )
  9. tdf#94234 Period separator missing from data series label formatting dialog ( Thanks to Gabor Kelemen )
  10. tdf#95495 Fileopen: List levels not recognized in .docx custom outline numbering ( Thanks to Szabolcs Toth )

WORKSFORME bugs

65 bugs have been retested by 31 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Julien Nabet ( 7 )
  2. eisa01 ( 6 )
  3. Timur ( 5 )
  4. Dieter ( 5 )
  5. Heiko Tietze ( 5 )
  6. Xisco Faulí ( 4 )
  7. raal ( 4 )
  8. Buovjaga ( 3 )
  9. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )
  10. Aron Budea ( 2 )

DUPLICATED bugs

172 bugs have been duplicated by 38 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 42 )
  2. Dieter ( 18 )
  3. V Stuart Foote ( 15 )
  4. Maxim Monastirsky ( 12 )
  5. Timur ( 11 )
  6. Julien Nabet ( 8 )
  7. Heiko Tietze ( 7 )
  8. Alex Thurgood ( 5 )
  9. eisa01 ( 4 )
  10. Aron Budea ( 4 )

Verified bug fixes

82 bugs have been verified by 14 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 60 )
  2. Timur ( 5 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 2 )
  5. Michael Weghorn ( 2 )
  6. V Stuart Foote ( 2 )
  7. Julien Nabet ( 2 )
  8. Oliver Grimm ( 1 )
  9. Kevin Suo ( 1 )
  10. Heiko Tietze ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

344 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 31 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. Dieter ( 79 )
  2. Roman Kuznetsov ( 75 )
  3. Rizal Muttaqin ( 28 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 22 )
  5. Aron Budea ( 20 )
  6. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 15 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 13 )
  8. Heiko Tietze ( 8 )
  9. Xisco Faulí ( 8 )
  10. Michael Weghorn ( 8 )

Regression Bugs

119 bugs have been set as regressions by 24 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 55 )
  2. raal ( 8 )
  3. Oliver Brinzing ( 7 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 7 )
  5. Roman Kuznetsov ( 6 )
  6. eisa01 ( 5 )
  7. Robert Großkopf ( 5 )
  8. Aron Budea ( 3 )
  9. Dieter ( 3 )
  10. Alex Thurgood ( 2 )

Bisected Bugs

108 bugs have been bisected by 11 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 64 )
  2. Aron Budea ( 16 )
  3. raal ( 8 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 7 )
  5. Michael Weghorn ( 3 )
  6. Oliver Brinzing ( 3 )
  7. Timur ( 2 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 2 )
  9. Roman Kuznetsov ( 1 )
  10. Justin L ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of Open bibisectRequests

Check the current list of open bibisectrequests here

Evolution of Highest Priority Bugs

Check the current list of highest priority bugs here

Evolution of High Priority Bugs

Check the current list of high priority bugs here

Thank you all for making Libreoffice rock!
Join us and help to keep LibreOffice super reliable!
Check the Get Involved page out now!

by x1sc0 at March 09, 2020 12:25 PM

March 04, 2020

CIB News

LibreOffice 6.4 – Wieder dicht am Microsoft Office Paket dran

libreOffice 6.4Mit jedem LibreOffice-Release tragen wir ein wenig mehr dazu bei, dass das Microsoft-Office-(fast)Monopol sich dem Ende nähert. Und wir sind stolz darauf! Auch Version 6.4 wurde von CIB mitentwickelt und enthält eine Reihe neuer nutzvoller Funktionen, die sicherlich wieder die Anzahl der Fans dieses beliebten Open Source Pakets erhöhen wird: Jetzt mit integriertem QR-Code-Generator. Die … LibreOffice 6.4 – Wieder dicht am Microsoft Office Paket dran weiterlesen

Der Beitrag LibreOffice 6.4 – Wieder dicht am Microsoft Office Paket dran erschien zuerst auf CIB Blog.

by CIB Marketing at March 04, 2020 08:41 AM

March 02, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

Sukapura is a new LibreOffice icon theme

Rizal Muttaqin has added a new icon theme into LibreOffice. Its name is Sukapura. That icon theme will be a default theme for a new LibreOffice installation in macOS. It looks very nice for me.
The Sukapura icon theme will available in future LibreOffice 7.0 release.
But, if you want, you can install it right now using a Rizal's extension.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at March 02, 2020 05:00 PM

February 28, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

Navigator imprevements by Jim Raykowski

Jim Raikowski, one from LibreOffice's developers, has made many very nice Navigator improvements for Writer and Calc.
- Navigator's categories are gray if they don't have any items. It works in Writer and in Calc Navigators.
- New items Go To, Edit, Delete, Rename were added for all objects context menu in Writer's Navigator (Headings, Tables, Frames, Images, etc.)
- New items Promote/Demote level and Promote/Demote chapter were added to Headings context menu in Writer's Navigator
- Added a new feature "Outline tracking" for Headings in Writer's Navigator. You'll can find it in Hedings context menu in the Navigator. It can be in three states: Default, Focus, Off. Try click by your mouse in several place in your big text document with many headings. You'll see that Headings in Navigator will be selected automatically according to text cursor position.
- It was replaced the navigation toolbox with the navigate by elements control. 
It all will be available in future LibreOffice 7 release in early August 2020. But you already can try it right now if you'll install a LibreOffice's daily build from https://dev-builds.libreoffice.org/daily/master/current.html.
Thanks Jim for your great work!

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at February 28, 2020 08:19 PM

February 26, 2020

Collabora Community

Collabora brings smooth editing to Android and iOS

Cambridge, February 27th, 2020, 12:00 CET – Today we are releasing Collabora Office for Android and iOS which will allow you to edit documents directly on your phone or tablet, guaranteeing your privacy and putting you in full control of your data and documents. This release fully integrates the iOS and Android apps into our Collabora Office product family. They are now a supported part of our business suite and come with every Collabora Office Enterprise subscription. Take a look: it’s a great app: feature rich, providing smooth editing, a polished user experience and lots of design goodness.

Rich editing for mobile devices – developed with your privacy in mind!

Collabora Office for Android and iOS
From opening … to viewing … to a rich editing experience

Collabora Office for Android   (minimal version 5.0) and iOS is fully open source and brings you slick and useful editing features, like rich copy and paste, that the competition fails to deliver.
The app does not depend on external storage or services, so can be used offline. There is no longer a reason to hand over your data to somebody else to get rich mobile editing. Thus you can regain control over your documents and edit them without compromising your privacy!

One-handed touch tools for all sorts of editing

 

Collabora Office allows tables to be changed easily and in many ways. Handles in the document, as well as an attractive palette of tools, helps you perfect your table layout.
In our new mobile app, you will find the features where you expect them to be, giving you access to powerful functionality.

Slides and sheets at your fingertips

Choose layout and animations for presentations. A unique feature allows slide masters to be edited as well as applied.

Collabora Office for iOS and Android comes with a refined touch of usability. Sort the slides in your presentations using the convenient slide sorter. Scroll through the different sheets of your spreadsheet with the touch of a fingertip. Mobile document editing has never been easier and more fun.

Experience the polished user interface & design

Lay out of presentation in Collabora Office for iOS and Android
Full control over layout of presentations

Rotating an image in a presentation
Rotate images with your fingertips

Text highlighting in a presentation
Highlight text with the tool at the palette

Copy & paste rich text objects on mobile

Our mobile solution stands out from all its competitors because of the smooth way in which it facilitates editing on mobile devices. Collabora Office allows you to actually copy and paste rich document content on your iOS or Android device. Try it out!

Attractive icons and an attractive layout

Sheet editing options in context menu

Collabora Office for iOS and Android text document
Editing your text file

Collabora Office for iOS and Android presentation
Editing the content of a presentation

Native platform document storage

Collabora Office gives you back control over your documents. This includes the freedom to decide where to store the documents you edit from your mobile device. Our app allows you to easily integrate with privacy respecting, open source storage services such as Nextcloud, ownCloud or Seafile as well as proprietary file services such as OneDrive, Dropbox etc. Naturally you can also store and edit documents locally on your device without an external storage space. We think it’s good to notice that all the features in Collabora Office are available for all users, independent if it’s for private or for business use.

Yet more polish

Smooth inertial scrolling has been added for this release, with significant work on performance and stability. We’ve added the ability to export to various different file formats, to provide a great collaboration and interoperability experience with the users of other apps. Many usability wins too numerous to mention have been implemented. We have bundled spell-checking for English, French, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese and German for now – while we investigate shrinking the installation size to fit more.

Two apps – one philosophy

Creating new document in iOS

Opening documents in the Android app

Last year, we paved the road so that the development of our mobile apps would be more consistent. In particular, the completely new development of the iOS app blazed the train. Both apps now share a substantially common codebase with our flagship product Collabora Online.

After our successful implementation on iOS, we re-used the same approach for our Android app. This replaced the existing LibreOffice Viewer code which had seen only very little activity for a long time, creating a fully functional and productive mobile office solution.

Welcome to the Collabora Office family

With today’s release, the apps for Android and iOS have officially become a part of our Collabora Office for Enterprise product. The family is now complete. These mobile apps complement Collabora Online and our existing desktop versions for Linux, MacOS and Windows. What does this mean for you? We can provide SLAs for our customers, as well as a close product management relationship to help steer our future development. Each improvement or issue addressed for one solution (online, mobile, desktop) can enhance all the others. Last but not least, it means the consistent and sustainable development of the mobile software.

For use on F-Droid, please use the APK file from this page.

Thanks to everyone who contributed!

Collabora invested huge effort and resources to bring into being a fully functional open source office suite for mobile devices. This success is built on the support of many individuals, the great LibreOffice community. Fundamentally this could not have been achieved without the support of SUSE, CloudOn, Smoose, Adfinis SyGroup and The Document Foundations’ generous historic donors. We cannot thank everyone involved enough for their passionate work. Please check our previous articles about the beta releases of the Android and iOS app, where we credit several of the people involved and where you can read more about their valuable contributions. All of our code is contributed to LibreOffice, and can be expected in LibreOffice 7, although we have our own theme. Would you like to be part of the story ? get involved today.


About Collabora Productivity

Collabora Productivity is the driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the cloud, providing Collabora Online and a range of products and consulting to enterprise and government. Powered by the largest team of certified LibreOffice engineers in the world, it is a leading contributor to the LibreOffice codebase and community. Collabora Office for Desktop and Collabora Online provide a business-hardened office suite with long-term, multi-platform support. Collabora Productivity is a division of Collabora, the global software consultancy dedicated to providing the benefits of Open Source to the commercial world, specializing in mobile, automotive and consumer electronics industries. For more information, visit www.collaboraoffice.com or follow @CollaboraOffice on Twitter.




The post Collabora brings smooth editing to Android and iOS appeared first on Collabora Productivity.

by Marc Rodrigues at February 26, 2020 11:31 AM

Miklos Vajna

Semi-transparent text in Writer

The problem

Last year I posted about work to have semi-transparent rendering of not only shape fill and shape borders, but also shape text in Draw. Now the same semi-transparent text feature is available in Writer as well. This improves compatibility with Word, which supports the same feature in its DOCX format. You can access the new option in the Format → Character dialog.

Result

Here is how the new, old and reference rendering looks like:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/oifzSVcdmKhomkQQKy4CNnPmamHtoo9CwRsbg9_ekbeK9Ov_4dFrzrJrYmDLHZNm-IvsoYNy8YfSs5kp4yEA42jybRO-8P-YKI8fYRu5ColRbzFHQBotP4MvkjanZG7JX9vP8Mcnnw=w640
Figure 1. Semi-transparent text in Writer, new rendering
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/RxtyxxIdrW14TtN30cf37e7RNHwnQpxlX-zhjhpWrggjStEERXvUnH7eDv8acM_8DcySNpnvpz5yWdwO12_cmQ6ZyCo4-fpIOdd3x9Q8SAXxAwuyMhfmjzhvS9VDBps8tQX-xB70RA=w640
Figure 2. Semi-transparent text in Writer, old rendering
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6rkCyXnzfiVN96D1h8PiKSIva1ydRFQXzUbXbbLC-9plXOUJnMRHZT2ba4eKt7W1wqfL3vscVgE1-QB5ztbp2uqSmguOALV8wyZDnCF4LPlyHSbVEm5atwZvf29w3PzRmjy11aQahA=w640
Figure 3. Semi-transparent text in Writer, reference rendering

Want to start using this?

You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release too (7.0).

by Miklos Vajna at February 26, 2020 10:25 AM

February 16, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

Russian LibreOffice Draw guide is updated to 6.3 version


Today I ended to update Russain LibreOffice Draw Guide from 4.3 to 6.3 version. It isn't a translate from an original guide to Russain because there is no original Draw Guide for 6.3 version.
You can download Russain LibreOffice Draw Guide6.3 by link.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at February 16, 2020 12:20 PM

February 12, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: January 2020

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.4 was released on January 29 containing many performance and interoperability improvements
  2. Participants in Ankara, Turkey bootcamp completed many easy hacks
  3. Participants in the Free Software Winter Camp 2020 in Eskişehir, Turkey completed many easy hacks
  4. Noel Grandin (Collabora) further sped up loading an XLSX file with lots of comments. Noel also continued converting XML handling bits to use the performant FastParser API
  5. Mike Kaganski (Collabora) made it so functions in Calc can use case sensitive regular expressions. Mike also fixed an Excel compatibility issue involving booleans
  6. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) continued the welding of UI elements, focusing on the Sidebar
  7. Tamás Bunth (Collabora) improved chart label interoperability with OOXML files
  8. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) made rotated text in Writer’s table rows with automatic height behave better
  9. Seth Chaiklin made dozens of improvements and additions to Help content. He also triaged and re-tested many bugs.
  10. Rizal Muttaqin improved most of the icon themes and Sifr in particular.
  11. Thorsten Wagner fixed a rendering issue in the character formatting font dropdown on macOS
  12. Serge Krot (CIB) improved the performance of Impress when typing into a list having an animation applied to it
  13. László Németh and Szabolcs Tóth (NISZ) fixed many DOCX table issues
  14. Jim Raykowski made the Navigator item category list appearance more user friendly. He also fixed a bunch of Navigator and Sidebar issues
  15. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed many OOXML chart label issues
  16. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) fixed a few issues with OOXML chart legends and data labels
  17. Luboš Luňák (Collabora) continued polishing the Skia graphics engine integration
  18. Heiko Tietze (TDF) and Andreas Kainz made many improvements to dialogs and Sidebar views
  19. Michael Stahl (CIB) made several fixes in PyUNO and Python build-related things. He also added an option to show markers for bookmarks inside the document text
  20. Andreas Kainz revampted the Compress Image dialog
  21. Guilhem Moulin and Ilmari Lauhakangas (TDF) improved the logerrit script, which helps when sending patches to Gerrit
  22. Regina Henschel implemented a fix for the skewing of drawing objects
  23. Luca Carlon added an SVG version of the Breeze dark icon set
  24. Katarina Behrens (CIB) fixed issues affecting the presentation console under Linux
  25. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) implemented accessibility checker and support for PDF/UA specs

Reported Bugs

604 bugs, 64 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 363 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. sdc.blanco ( 35 )
  2. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 18 )
  3. Xisco Faulí ( 15 )
  4. Mike Kaganski ( 14 )
  5. andreas_k ( 14 )
  6. Roman Kuznetsov ( 11 )
  7. R. Green ( 9 )
  8. TorrAB ( 9 )
  9. Telesto ( 8 )
  10. Regina Henschel ( 7 )

Triaged Bugs

607 bugs have been triaged by 83 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 129 )
  2. Heiko Tietze ( 63 )
  3. Dieter ( 57 )
  4. Julien Nabet ( 52 )
  5. Timur ( 30 )
  6. Roman Kuznetsov ( 23 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 21 )
  8. Oliver Brinzing ( 18 )
  9. m.a.riosv ( 17 )
  10. Mike Kaganski ( 13 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

555 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

222 bugs have been fixed by 50 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. Caolán McNamara ( 23 )
  2. Mike Kaganski ( 18 )
  3. Seth Chaiklin ( 15 )
  4. Miklos Vajna ( 8 )
  5. László Németh ( 8 )
  6. Jim Raykowski ( 8 )
  7. Balazs Varga ( 6 )
  8. Luboš Luňák ( 6 )
  9. Michael Stahl ( 5 )
  10. Szabolcs Toth ( 4 )

List of critical bugs fixed

  1. tdf#127619 macOS — LibreOffice crash within 40s after opening app when online update automatically enabled, or with check from the Extension manager — https certificate issues ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  2. tdf#129484 Crash when trying to view property of a component from forms (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  3. tdf#130090 Create New Folder in the Save Dialog crashes with the gen (X11) VCL plugin ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  4. tdf#130179 CRASH: inserting comment to picture ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  5. tdf#130286 Crash in: SwDrawTextShell::Execute(SfxRequest &) ( Thanks to Szymon Kłos )

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#125662 Bad allocation crash while saving Calc with copied columns (x86) ( Thanks to Dennis Francis )
  2. tdf#128782 When execute undo, Text box moves. ( Thanks to Vasily Melenchuk )
  3. tdf#129883 Section links are lost on save and reload (see c3-c4) ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  4. tdf#129887 CRASH: Scrolling down document ( Thanks to Serge Krot )
  5. tdf#129908 Crash at Data > Group and outlone > AutoOutline ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  6. tdf#130075 EDITING – While pasting data in a table, selecting “Next” makes Base crash ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  7. tdf#130093 FILEOPEN: LWP: General input/output error ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  8. tdf#130214 CRASH: importing file ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  9. tdf#93389 Document recovery strips encryption ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  10. tdf#94801 Fileopen DOCX: Text in table different width in Writer (multiple lines) and Word (single line) for Microsoft fonts – 0,1cm difference ( Thanks to László Németh )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#125662 Bad allocation crash while saving Calc with copied columns (x86) ( Thanks to Dennis Francis )
  2. tdf#127619 macOS — LibreOffice crash within 40s after opening app when online update automatically enabled, or with check from the Extension manager — https certificate issues ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  3. tdf#129382 CRASH: Importing a specific file ( See comment 6 ) ( Thanks to Vasily Melenchuk )
  4. tdf#129412 Crash when registered data source is not available. ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  5. tdf#129484 Crash when trying to view property of a component from forms (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#129546 Skia: Crash when starting LO without supported device ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  7. tdf#129659 CRASH on file opening ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  8. tdf#129712 Crash in: mergedlo.dll after pasting as Unformatted text in Draw’s Text box ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  9. tdf#129798 Crash in: SwViewShell::GetDoc() — show print with Field dialog open ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  10. tdf#129805 Crash when copying the content of a complex DOCX ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  11. tdf#129839 Crash inspecting properties of cell range object in IDE ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  12. tdf#129850 CRASH: Inserting table (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  13. tdf#129887 CRASH: Scrolling down document ( Thanks to Serge Krot )
  14. tdf#129908 Crash at Data > Group and outlone > AutoOutline ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  15. tdf#130075 EDITING – While pasting data in a table, selecting “Next” makes Base crash ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  16. tdf#130090 Create New Folder in the Save Dialog crashes with the gen (X11) VCL plugin ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  17. tdf#130155 Writer navigator crashes when + is pressed on entries without children ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  18. tdf#130179 CRASH: inserting comment to picture ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  19. tdf#130214 CRASH: importing file ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  20. tdf#130239 CRASH: Closing LibreOffice while Infobox is displayed ( gtk3 ) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  21. tdf#130286 Crash in: SwDrawTextShell::Execute(SfxRequest &) ( Thanks to Szymon Kłos )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#129158 sorting multiple selected rows leads to CALC hanging ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  2. tdf#129708 Impress: Long operation during typing in animated list ( Thanks to Serge Krot )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#45589 Show bookmarks: make them visible in a document ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  2. tdf#48436 Data Label Placement needs absolute coordinates ( Thanks to Balazs Varga )
  3. tdf#54938 Adapt supportsService implementations to cppu::supportsService ( Thanks to Batuhan Taskaya )
  4. tdf#57113 Macros: Unicode vs. password protected user libraries ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  5. tdf#77796 FILEOPEN: DOCX – Table cell padding (defined in table style) not imported correctly ( Thanks to László Németh )
  6. tdf#78840 Add the regular expression (?ismwx-ismwx: … ) Flag settings. Evaluate parenthesized expression with specifics flags enabled or -disabled. To have a case sensitive mode in functions using regular expressions. ( Thanks to Eike Rathke )
  7. tdf#83779 FILESAVE: Error in saving as Excel files – logical boolean type of FALSE and TRUE values not preserved during input ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  8. tdf#88496 FORMATTING Multiple row table header pushed to next page if rows do not fit (unless one sets table properties .. uncheck Repeat Heading). behavior different from MS Word ( Thanks to László Németh )
  9. tdf#88713 Cycling through Navigator reminders is done in the wrong order ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  10. tdf#90069 DOCX: Font style table inconsistencies, new cells resetting font styles ( Thanks to László Németh )
  11. tdf#92497 Update documentation for style management group button in Styles & Formatting sidebar ( Thanks to Seth Chaiklin )
  12. tdf#93389 Document recovery strips encryption ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  13. tdf#94411 In alphabetical indexes f. and ff. should be used – not p. or pp. ( Thanks to Seth Chaiklin )
  14. tdf#94801 Fileopen DOCX: Text in table different width in Writer (multiple lines) and Word (single line) for Microsoft fonts – 0,1cm difference ( Thanks to László Németh )
  15. tdf#95033 Borders missing from some table cells in DOCX file (borders element of tblPrEx tag) ( Thanks to László Németh )

WORKSFORME bugs

96 bugs have been retested by 33 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 18 )
  2. Timur ( 11 )
  3. Buovjaga ( 11 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 8 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 8 )
  6. Telesto ( 6 )
  7. Cor Nouws ( 4 )
  8. b. ( 3 )
  9. Heiko Tietze ( 3 )
  10. Terrence Enger ( 2 )

DUPLICATED bugs

121 bugs have been duplicated by 32 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 22 )
  2. Timur ( 19 )
  3. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 12 )
  4. V Stuart Foote ( 11 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 8 )
  6. Heiko Tietze ( 6 )
  7. Oliver Brinzing ( 5 )
  8. sdc.blanco ( 3 )
  9. Dieter ( 3 )
  10. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )

Verified bug fixes

83 bugs have been verified by 15 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 60 )
  2. Dieter ( 6 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 4 )
  4. Timur ( 2 )
  5. Gerhard Weydt ( 1 )
  6. V Stuart Foote ( 1 )
  7. Gerald Pfeifer ( 1 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 1 )
  9. mhall ( 1 )
  10. Ming Hua ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

302 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 32 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. sdc.blanco ( 62 )
  2. Dieter ( 55 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 41 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 21 )
  5. V Stuart Foote ( 21 )
  6. Eyal Rozenberg ( 19 )
  7. Aron Budea ( 10 )
  8. DaeHyun Sung ( 8 )
  9. Buovjaga ( 7 )
  10. Oliver Brinzing ( 7 )

Regression Bugs

77 bugs have been set as regressions by 18 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 31 )
  2. Timur ( 12 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 9 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 3 )
  5. Telesto ( 3 )
  6. Buovjaga ( 2 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 2 )
  8. m.a.riosv ( 2 )
  9. raal ( 2 )
  10. Cor Nouws ( 2 )

Bisected Bugs

62 bugs have been bisected by 11 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 33 )
  2. Telesto ( 7 )
  3. raal ( 6 )
  4. Aron Budea ( 5 )
  5. Mihkel Tõnnov ( 2 )
  6. Roman Kuznetsov ( 2 )
  7. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 2 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 2 )
  9. Buovjaga ( 1 )
  10. Timur ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of Open bibisectRequests

Check the current list of open bibisectrequests here

Evolution of Highest Priority Bugs

Check the current list of highest priority bugs here

Evolution of High Priority Bugs

Check the current list of high priority bugs here

Thank you all for making Libreoffice rock!
Join us and help to keep LibreOffice super reliable!
Check the Get Involved page out now!

by x1sc0 at February 12, 2020 03:39 PM

February 07, 2020

Collabora Community

Great Response to the LibreOffice Development Workshop at Free Software Winter Camp 2020

Every Winter the Anadolu University in Eskişehir, Turkey, hosts a large Free Software Winter Camp. This year it took place from Jan 25 – Jan 28, 2020, covering over 50 different classes with more than 40 different topics, and close to 1500 participants tutored by over 100 instructors. One of those classes was the LibreOffice Development Workshop, sponsored by Collabora Productivity.

For the four days of intensive training 20 students from all over the country were accepted. While the workshop itself was free, the participants were expected to cover the costs for travel and accommodation. This year 16 students showed for LibreOffice Development Workshop given by Collabora’s Muhammet Kara – a number which was a significant increase compared to the number from the previous year!

The participants of the LibreOffice Development Workshop at Free Software Winter Camp 2020.

In order to be accepted, the students had to have knowledge in C++, the principals of object-oriented programming, and at least user-level experience on a GNU/Linux system. During the workshop the 16 participants got familiar with the processes and tools of LibreOffice development and bug fixing.

Within the four days workshop the students contributed 64 commits, documented in the LibreOffice wiki. Two memorable examples of contributions were an important improvement by Onur Yilmaz for the Automatic Redaction feature and a Python script to analyse the LibreOffice code-base for styling issues written by Batuhan Taşkaya.

Muhammet Kara reported, that the feedback from the participants was very positive:

“Almost all pointed out that they have improved their development skills, and they would like to continue contributing.”

We would like to take this opportunity to express our appreciation once again to the effort of Muhammet, the Linux Users Association of Turkey and Anadolu University for providing this exceptional training opportunity. We look forward seeing more contributions from that dedicated group of participants.

Are you searching for a interesting open source project to join? Remember, you’re really welcome to participate in CODE – the Collabora Online Development Edition.

Participate in CODE

The post Great Response to the LibreOffice Development Workshop at Free Software Winter Camp 2020 appeared first on Collabora Productivity.

by Marc Rodrigues at February 07, 2020 08:48 AM

January 25, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

LibreOffice 6.4 RC3 is available

LibreOffice 6.4 RC3 is available for downloading now. There are builds for all main OS for 64 bit. There is a 32 bit build for Windows also. These builds are only for testing.
Links for direct downloading below:
Source code
Description of fixed bugs in LibreOffice 6.4 RC3 compare with LibreOffice 6.4 RC2 is by link.
If you found a bug in LibreOffice 6.4 RC3, then please file a bug reprort in our Bugzilla.
I think it's a latest test build before final LibreOffice 6.4 release. Possibly LibreOffice 6.4 RC3 will be a final release without any change as it already was before.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at January 25, 2020 07:39 PM

January 24, 2020

Miklos Vajna

Improved rotated text handling in Writer's table rows with automatic height

Writer now has better support for rotated text in tables containing rows with automatic height. This post also presents two related fixes.

First, thanks Otevřená města who made this work by Collabora possible.

Before diving into improved rotated text handling, first a continuous section break import problem (tdf#128605) was fixed: this was a case when we created a new page style, but only a new section was intended. Here is how the fix looks:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ycsIqjpdm5t2n9FQQhKBbWobpsX2cQ0s-ugLn970XwuGafzL79HzNVly6dYUpLMhTQmZq8Aa36kaGIfWfk-MzYmuSr92zhRUxFk1aNqwDOnTy1cyyrRzCguuvp-Wd3LD8XXzo_Aurg=w640
Figure 1. Importing continuous section break, fixed
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/jLUVDTY3Z6-IWVCmSfia7ue_aSpXSG7YJK2WqhRCfJkdTgA3cVFRh8TiYZwKRut7vvC0yFkdGBzl9Wpv2auZpg6d84nmDI1gVHBZPmWsf_YA-5qD-SF8Uf2lBG7NOu9RcidR1bQ0ng=w640
Figure 2. Importing continuous section break, original
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/izfhxSHtYg_QmeJdIY_NnX5uiaRsmDHQoPlAsofQSaLJERNzVq_gkOMShR-fzckvAd6E5D-ZEMbr41Db2PEMeUZA8gL-oqJsvf_3PytuxJhL95wz4Fsh-2JakWefx4Tes2MoHlFWWw=w640
Figure 3. Importing continuous section break, reference

What you can see is that the continuous section break used to result in an unwanted page break, and this is gone now.

Regarding the actual rotated text handling (tdf#128611), there were two problems there:

  • There was a missing flip handling for line shapes

  • Poor layout of rotated text in table cells with automatic height

Here is how the fix looks like:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/GFCNQDcvXsN2w1ADVo10H16FUOYB8i6jBTrPad0r6qa8nt8PmDBDD1oiDfG9Zs9_3eVqdyB-O-u6oWIBAujcyso2utvnDpdE4Bs2PykeJkbh0vSYMZDSIKsjv7vI06j9HUCru2Z19w=w640
Figure 4. Rotated text in table cells with auto height, fixed (both flip of line and text layout)
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/IqsWjKbTD03_wnvUMUe_QK1pqdTfZKizoNEHRQDQuvpw_O8mrEQ8AgNk_2qbP49QUpezknqHDxnhn0eYDpfZL833dXaClRPD1e4_wxuTj5mTRTeEgioBCX0djcWa5vNSRdPmnalphA=w640
Figure 5. Rotated text in table cells with auto height, fixed (only flip of line so far)
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/2Tkkj7oz9Bm9ckPs5lTGwAGBRokEJ0MWxfqrbqu6afp6Xm1I77zft8riW-kTxKo4kJsO6bwMtaZb0XNToFssEc1kkZuzm0qk0H4eLU-xk8DOd-e5eVMtNR6cYD_1FRDWbCIYok1oJg=w640
Figure 6. Rotated text in table cells with auto height, original
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/m3X4dGiUTsFBnVwQhiEpcAQYGAJ_8vbKN93jivrcsKcCvjaornrk0upCvsTmck1e39XISyuYNc47BF1tuyrskoWLuMhpegtbyPh1KjBD7_wD-oLueaaLbjYnrgReSRkS5krvK1y4LQ=w640
Figure 7. Rotated text in table cells with auto height, reference

What you can see is that the line clearing the table cell had a vertical flip, which was lost on import. Also, the rotated text in the "row heading" cells was broken into multiple columns. Both are fixed now.

All this is available in LibreOffice master (towards 6.4), so you can try it out right now, if interested.

by Miklos Vajna at January 24, 2020 08:37 AM

January 23, 2020

Collabora Community

Collabora supports Free Software Winter Camp 2020 in Eskişehir, Turkey

Twenty-one students have been selected to take part in the LibreOffice Development Workshop at the Anadolu University, EskiÅŸehir, Turkey. It is held from Jan 25 to Jan 28 as a part of the Free Software Winter Camp 2020.

Collabora Sponsored LibreOffice Bootcamp in Ankara
Impression of the previous LibreOffice Bootcamp in Ankara

Collabora Productivity is one of the sponsors. Muhammet Kara, Collabora developer who is giving the LibrOffice training, explains that it’s not suitable for just every interested student.

“Of course enthusiasm is very important. But we also require students to have knowledge/experience with C++, and come with GNU/Linux installed on their laptops. And they will try to build LibreOffice before coming.”

This looks as a perfect match for students that followed for example the LibreOffice Bootcamp in Ankara… but there will be others for sure!
Muhammet tells about the program:

“During the camp, we will go through the usual stuff of getting started with LO development, code- structure, tips&tricks etc. And will work on bugs to gain hands-on experience.”

The accommodations will be provided by the Linux Users Association of Turkey, organizers of the event. Find details on the LibreOffice-wiki too.

Thanks Muhammet, Linux Users Association of Turkey and Anadolu University for making this possible!
Of course we wish the participants good luck, and keep an eye on github for LibreOffice or online 😉

The post Collabora supports Free Software Winter Camp 2020 in EskiÅŸehir, Turkey appeared first on Collabora Productivity.

by Cor Nouws at January 23, 2020 05:22 PM

Intersecting Intel & AMD Instruction Set Extensions

In some of my projects, I’ve recently had the need to utilize FMA (fused-multiply-add) or AVX instructions. Compiling C/C++ on X86_64 will by default only activate MXX and a few of the early SSE extensions. The utilized instruction set basically predates the core2 which was introduced in 2006. Math…

January 23, 2020 11:31 AM

January 22, 2020

Tomaž Vajngerl

Accessibility checker and support for PDF/UA specs

PDF/UA or ISO 14289 is a specifications that defines the requirements for accessibility in a PDF document. The specification defines the required structure and formatting of the document (also refers to WCAG specification from W3C for use on the web) and PDF features, which should be enabled or disabled so the document is better suited for accessibility (for example PDF tags are required).

Thanks to the Dutch Standardisation Forum for financially sponsoring and Collabora Productivity in cooperation with Nou&Off for the work on implementing this specification into LibreOffice.

Figure 1: PDF Export
The implementation in LibreOffice is currently done only for Writer. It consists of two parts.: First is to enable PDF/UA support into PDF export, which writes a PDF/UA flag into the PDF document and enables all the required features. The PDF export dialog was extended with a checkbox (see figure 1).

Figure 2: Accessibility Check in menu 

The second part is an accessibility check functionality, which traverses the document structure and gather all possible accessibility issues. The accessibility check can be run manually through the menu under Tools - Accessibility Checker (see figure 2), or it will be triggered after PDF export dialog, if the PDF/UA support is enabled. The accessibility issues are presented in a dialog (see figure 3).

Figure 3: Accessibility check dialog

The checks that are (currently) implemented are:

  • Check that the document title is set.
  • Check that the document language is set, or that all styles that are in use, have the language set.
  • Check all images, graphics, OLE objects for the alt (or title in some objects) text.
  • Check tables don't include splits or merges, which aren't allowed by the specifications. The table should be 
  • Check for fake/manual numbering (not using integrated numbering). For example writing "1." "2." "3." at the beginning of the paragraphs.  
  • Check that hyperlink text is not a hyperlink itself - hyperlink should be described. 
  • Check for the contrast between text and the background. The algorithm is described in the WCAG specification.  
  • Check for blinking text, discouraged for the obvious reasons.
  • Check for footnotes and endnotes, which should be avoided.
  • Check for heading order. Order of the headings must increase incrementally with no skips (for example Heading 1 to Heading 3, skipping Heading 2).
  • Check, if text conveys additional meaning with (direct) formatting.

The PDF/UA support will be included in LibreOffice 7.

by Tomaž Vajngerl (noreply@blogger.com) at January 22, 2020 08:54 AM

January 21, 2020

Luboš Luňák

Skipping functions from entire directories while debugging (e.g. skip all functions from system headers)

So, today I got finally so tired of navigating (or explicitly stepping over) all the internal functions in gdb (you know, all the inline functions from STL containers, from Boost, from this pointer wrapper class, that string class) that I finally googled 'gdb skip system functions'. And guess what, it's been there since gdb 7.12, from 3 years ago, and it's almost trivial, just adding something like this to ~/.gdbinit:

skip -gfi /usr/include/*
skip -gfi /usr/include/*/*
skip -gfi /usr/include/*/*/*
skip -gfi /usr/include/*/*/*/*

 I feel so stu^H^H^Hproud for catching up only 3 years late.

by llunak (noreply@blogger.com) at January 21, 2020 04:41 PM

January 20, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

Next release after LibreOffice 6.4 will be LibreOffice 7

Congratulations! Next release after LibreOffice 6.4 will be LibreOffice 7 instead LibreOffice 6.5. Look at that message in marketing mail list.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at January 20, 2020 04:41 AM

January 15, 2020

Andreas Kainz

Image Compression

Finally LibreOffice image compression did what you expect. Shrink your image or the impress presentation and don’t destroy your pictures.

Old default settings were 90 for JPEG Quality and reduce image resolution to 96 DPI.

New settings are 80 for JPEG Quality and reduce image resolution to 300 DPI. It frustrate me for long time that with 96 DPI all images that will be compressed with LibreOffice are blurred and didn’t fit in any case. After write Bug 128658 and nobody fixed the bug for me, I fixed it myself with 7 lines of code 🙂

The best bug report are the reports you can fix yourself. Be proud of yourself fill bug reports and fix them yourself.

downloads_wordmark_white_on_coral2x.jpg

by kdeonlinux at January 15, 2020 10:26 PM

January 14, 2020

>Marius Popa Adrian

Firebird 3.0.5 sub-release is available

Firebird Project is happy to announce general availability of Firebird 3.0.5 — the 5th point release in the Firebird 3.0 series. This sub-release offers many bug fixes and also adds a few improvements, please refer to the Release Notes for the full list of changes.Binary kits for Windows and Linux platforms are immediately available for download, Android and Mac OS packages will follow shortly.

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at January 14, 2020 09:32 AM

January 13, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

LibreOffice 6.4 RC2 is ready for testing!

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.4 RC2 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.4 will be released as final at the end of January, 2020, being LibreOffice 6.4 RC2 the forth pre-release since the development of version 6.4 started in the beginning of June, 2019 ( See the release plan ). Since LibreOffice 6.4 RC1 ( the previous pre-release ), 90 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 58 bugs have been fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 6.4 RC2 can be downloaded from here, it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. ( Note that it will replace your actual installation )

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email address in order to create a new account ) so it can get fixed before LibreOffice 6.4 final is released.

For help, you can contact the QA Team directly in the IRC channel.

Happy testing!!

Download it now!

by x1sc0 at January 13, 2020 11:30 AM

Tamás Bunth

Custom label in LibreOffice charts

There has been some progress in LibreOffice related to custom labels on charts. Let’s take a look at the following example document:

The above picture is extracted from a .docx document created by Word. When importing the document using LibreOffice, the diagram looks like this:

LibreOffice is now able to import custom text extracted from an OOXML document and store it in the ODF format. In order to do this, there was no need for extending the ODF structure, because it can already be accomplished using the <chart:data-label> tag. Multiple paragraphs are supported in one label. Apparently, style elements are not yet imported correctly, but the good news is it can be further developed without modifying the ODF format.

In addition, support for inserting percentage into the custom field is added:

The diagram above contains custom labels for each of its slices. Percentage fields have been added as new paragraphs into the labels. The text of these fields will dynamically change when changing the underlying data.

Thanks for SUSE for sponsoring this development.

by Bunth Tamás at January 13, 2020 10:09 AM

January 10, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: December 2019

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.3.4 was released on December, 12
  2. LibreOffice 6.4.0 RC1 was released on December 23 and a Bug Hunting Session took place the same day
  3. Ilmari Lauhakangas (TDF) published a blogpost wrapping all the improvements achieved by the PPTX Team in the last months
  4. Mike Kaganski (Collabora) made find & replace regular expressions work with look-behind and look-ahead assertions, fixed the display of multi-line formulas, fixed the importing of DOCX files with Tables of Contents and other indices
  5. Jim Raykowski completed the integration of the new colour palette and removed the old background tab page code, fixed a very popular annoyance concerning duplicated labels in Customize dialog (with additional contributions from Caolán McNamara of Red Hat) and fixed many accessibility issues
  6. Jan Holešovský (Collabora) fixed many under-the-hood issues with the Android application
  7. Dennis Francis (Collabora) fixed a frame-anchoring issue, which made elements fly into all the wrong places in Writer
  8. Andreas Kainz improved the Notebookbar UIs
  9. László Németh (NISZ) fixed several issues with DOCX tables and pasting to Writer tables. He also implemented several AutoCorrect fixes and enhancements
  10. Chris Sherlock made many under-the-hood improvements to the EMF+ handling code and implemented support for more EMF+ features
  11. Justin Luth (Collabora/SIL) fixed a DOCX import footnote issue and completed a multifaceted fix for a DOCX issue involving subscripts in character styles
  12. Samuel Mehrbrodt (CIB) added an infobar notification for cases of missing hyphenation information and improved the infobar behaviour in general
  13. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) improved the behaviour of measurement units in the UI input fields, fixed issues in Calc cell style settings dialog and made many improvements to the UI code, including getting native GTK widgets working in the Sidebar
  14. Regina Henschel fixed unwanted rotation and position changes of a shape anchored to a Calc cell
  15. Noel Grandin (Collabora) fixed a performance issue when copying a large bulleted list, improved the speed of exporting a large document to PDF, improved the loading time of an XLSX file with lots of comments and made many cleanups under the hood
  16. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed number formatting in DOCX chart data labels
  17. Bakos Attila (NISZ) fixed shape anchoring in DOCX tables
  18. Michael Stahl (CIB) fixed an issue with DOCX continuous sections
  19. Muhammet Kara (Collabora) guided students in Ankara, Turkey to complete many C++ easy hacks
  20. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) added functionality to check Writer documents for accessibility problems to make the document conform to PDF/UA requirements
  21. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) added support for semi-transparent text
  22. Kohei Yoshida published some Benchmark results on mdds multi_type_vector

Reported Bugs

580 bugs, 83 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 320 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 36 )
  2. Nicolas Christener ( 29 )
  3. sdc.blanco ( 20 )
  4. Mike Kaganski ( 16 )
  5. Roman Kuznetsov ( 14 )
  6. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 13 )
  7. DM ( 9 )
  8. R. Green ( 9 )
  9. Markus Elfring ( 9 )
  10. Rizal Muttaqin ( 8 )

Triaged Bugs

595 bugs have been triaged by 81 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 150 )
  2. Dieter Praas ( 58 )
  3. Timur ( 56 )
  4. Heiko Tietze ( 34 )
  5. V Stuart Foote ( 31 )
  6. Julien Nabet ( 30 )
  7. Oliver Brinzing ( 20 )
  8. Roman Kuznetsov ( 17 )
  9. Olivier Hallot ( 16 )
  10. Mike Kaganski ( 15 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

578 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

183 bugs have been fixed by 43 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. Caolán McNamara ( 22 )
  2. Mike Kaganski ( 11 )
  3. László Németh ( 10 )
  4. Noel Grandin ( 8 )
  5. Michael Stahl ( 6 )
  6. Jim Raykowski ( 5 )
  7. Jan-Marek Glogowski ( 5 )
  8. Roman Kuznetsov ( 4 )
  9. Miklos Vajna ( 4 )
  10. Samuel Mehrbrodt ( 4 )

List of critical bugs fixed

  1. tdf#112989 Time required to export a large document has doubled for Latin (text layout issue) ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  2. tdf#129533 Calc crashes on Navigator click or move ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  3. tdf#99711 Sidebar Position and Size displays incorrect width and height when units in mm ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#105225 Color palette cannot be chosen in various places ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  2. tdf#108458 Label changes for Toolbar use degrade function listing in the Customize dialog–have duplicate entries on the list ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  3. tdf#116194 table content from .DOCX shown as text in Writer ( Thanks to László Németh )
  4. tdf#127022 menu bar is broken in RTL interface on Windows ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  5. tdf#128077 Always reproducible complete crash/lock of all LibreOffice windows ( steps in comment 10 ) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#128449 Inserting image as background results in blue bg ( Thanks to Aron Budea )
  7. tdf#128845 EDITING: cannot modify a bibliography entry after creating it ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  8. tdf#129119 crash in launching Customize dialog from StartCenter Tools -> Customize ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  9. tdf#129127 Crash when sort by column of Excel 97-2003 file with specific data ( Thanks to Dennis Francis )
  10. tdf#129165 Impress: right-click menu on slide in Slide Pane is not available anymore ( Thanks to Xisco Fauli )
  11. tdf#129210 CRASH: recovering database file ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  12. tdf#37156 FORMATTING: Paste table result different for paste destination “table cell” or “normal text area” ( Thanks to László Németh )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#127955 Crash when opening Insert Fields in Writer ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  2. tdf#128077 Always reproducible complete crash/lock of all LibreOffice windows ( steps in comment 10 ) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  3. tdf#129056 CRASH: changing line’s colour in chart sidebar ( Thanks to Muhammet Kara )
  4. tdf#129076 impress slideshow crashes with skia backend ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  5. tdf#129119 crash in launching Customize dialog from StartCenter Tools -> Customize ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#129127 Crash when sort by column of Excel 97-2003 file with specific data ( Thanks to Dennis Francis )
  7. tdf#129136 crash in basic function CurDir ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  8. tdf#129192 Sharing a file will crash the Android app ( Thanks to Jan Holesovsky )
  9. tdf#129210 CRASH: recovering database file ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  10. tdf#129346 CRASH: sd::SdUnoSlideView::getCurrentPage() ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  11. tdf#129519 Crash when using two or more documents from the same WebDAV server ( Thanks to Thorsten Behrens )
  12. tdf#129533 Calc crashes on Navigator click or move ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#112989 Time required to export a large document has doubled for Latin (text layout issue) ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  2. tdf#119227 A five second freeze when copying a large bulleted list ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  3. tdf#129227 Poor performance in a Basic code ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  4. tdf#129228 FILEOPEN XLSX: file won’t open then very slow (2 speedups in this bug) ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  5. tdf#129256 ReDim is slow when array custom type is explicitly known ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#34517 UI: Texts in context menu ‘Arrangement for chart lines’ interchanged ( Thanks to Kelemen Gábor )
  2. tdf#35570 Moving rows (and columns too) in tables overwrites content ( Thanks to László Németh )
  3. tdf#37156 FORMATTING: Paste table result different for paste destination “table cell” or “normal text area” ( Thanks to László Németh )
  4. tdf#38394 EDITING: Can’t insert a French opening quote after an apostrophe using AutoCorrection ( Thanks to László Németh )
  5. tdf#47583 PRINTING: Behaviour of Writer Print Options are not Transparent ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  6. tdf#54409 AutoCorrect not correcting word next to smart/curved quote-mark (single or double) ( Thanks to László Németh )
  7. tdf#59327 BASIC: A missing optional argument is treated as a not declared variable. ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  8. tdf#59666 EDITING: Option to disable Greek letters (αβγδελμ..) converting to big letters (ABGDE…) as automatic capitalization of first letters in sentence ( Thanks to László Németh )
  9. tdf#64902 Add new menu options to move rows/columns in tables without overwriting the original cells ( Thanks to László Németh )
  10. tdf#65038 EDITING: Search&Replace doesn’t replace regular expression with Look assertions (ahead-behind) ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  11. tdf#75806 SearchWords in ReplaceDescriptor ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  12. tdf#83248 PRINTING: “Single-line” text box always printed in black ( Thanks to Arnaud Versini )
  13. tdf#87569 FILEOPEN: Incorrect layout of table in DOCX file ( Thanks to Bakos Attila )

WORKSFORME bugs

111 bugs have been retested by 49 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Timur ( 17 )
  2. Xisco Faulí ( 11 )
  3. Michael Weghorn ( 8 )
  4. Alex Thurgood ( 6 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 6 )
  6. Buovjaga ( 6 )
  7. m.a.riosv ( 5 )
  8. Telesto ( 3 )
  9. Dieter Praas ( 3 )
  10. Heiko Tietze ( 3 )

DUPLICATED bugs

150 bugs have been duplicated by 38 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Timur ( 44 )
  2. Xisco Faulí ( 23 )
  3. Michael Weghorn ( 7 )
  4. V Stuart Foote ( 6 )
  5. Heiko Tietze ( 5 )
  6. Dieter Praas ( 5 )
  7. m.a.riosv ( 5 )
  8. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 4 )
  9. Mike Kaganski ( 4 )
  10. BogdanB ( 4 )

Verified bug fixes

170 bugs have been verified by 17 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. raal ( 78 )
  2. Xisco Faulí ( 54 )
  3. Dieter Praas ( 9 )
  4. Thorsten Behrens (CIB) ( 8 )
  5. Buovjaga ( 4 )
  6. Timur ( 3 )
  7. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )
  8. BogdanB ( 2 )
  9. V Stuart Foote ( 1 )
  10. Vera Blagoveschenskaya ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

304 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 36 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. Roman Kuznetsov ( 69 )
  2. Dieter Praas ( 56 )
  3. Aron Budea ( 35 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 20 )
  5. V Stuart Foote ( 14 )
  6. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 14 )
  7. Chris Sherlock ( 14 )
  8. oesterblog-admin ( 11 )
  9. Timur ( 9 )
  10. Oliver Brinzing ( 8 )

Regression Bugs

106 bugs have been set as regressions by 23 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 51 )
  2. Timur ( 17 )
  3. raal ( 5 )
  4. Roman Kuznetsov ( 5 )
  5. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 4 )
  6. Oliver Brinzing ( 4 )
  7. Mike Kaganski ( 2 )
  8. Dieter Praas ( 2 )
  9. Justin L ( 2 )
  10. Boaz Dodin ( 1 )

Bisected Bugs

84 bugs have been bisected by 12 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 59 )
  2. raal ( 10 )
  3. Oliver Brinzing ( 4 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 2 )
  5. Justin L ( 2 )
  6. Telesto ( 1 )
  7. Kevin Suo ( 1 )
  8. Terrence Enger ( 1 )
  9. Mike Kaganski ( 1 )
  10. Thomas Bertels ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of Open bibisectRequests

Check the current list of open bibisectrequests here

Evolution of Highest Priority Bugs

Check the current list of highest priority bugs here

Evolution of High Priority Bugs

Check the current list of high priority bugs here

Thank you all for making Libreoffice rock!
Join us and help to keep LibreOffice super reliable!
Check the Get Involved page out now!

by x1sc0 at January 10, 2020 02:02 PM

>Marius Popa Adrian

Firebird high-level native client for Node.js / TypeScript updated to v2.1.0

Firebird high-level native client for Node.js / TypeScript updated to v2.1.0 with a few changes . Feature #30 - Add methods executeReturningAsObject and fetchAsObject to return records as objects instead of arrays. Feature #43 - Add Statement.columnLabels property.

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at January 10, 2020 09:47 AM

Wire encryption plugin using chacha cypher in Firebird master branch

AlexPeshkoff Added wire crypt plugin using ChaCha cipher Co-authored-by: Vlad Khorsun Here is the pull request #244

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at January 10, 2020 09:36 AM

January 06, 2020

>Marius Popa Adrian

SHA-256 in Firebird 3.0.x

Thanks to contributions from Alex Peshkov and Tony Whyman in Firebird 3.0.4 SHA-256 message digest may be used instead of SHA-1 for generating the client proof: https://firebirdsql.org/file/documentation/release_notes/html/en/3_0/rnfb30-security-new-authentication.html#rnfb30-security-srp-patch304 Here is the related patch and proposed fix : CORE-5788

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at January 06, 2020 03:56 PM

December 28, 2019

Jean Hollis Weber

LibreOffice 6.2 Calc Guide published

LibreOffice 6.2 Calc Guide front coverIt’s been a long time coming, but an updated version of the LibreOffice Calc Guide has finally been completed by the Documentation Team.

Free PDFs are here: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Documentation/Publications#LibreOffice_Calc_Guide and will be linked from the main LibreOffice website in the new year.

A printed copy can be purchased here: http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/libreoffice-62-calc-guide/26019667

by Jean at December 28, 2019 09:39 AM

December 23, 2019

LibreOffice QA Blog

LibreOffice 6.4 RC1 is ready for testing!

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 6.4 RC1 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 6.4 will be released as final at the end of January, 2020, being LibreOffice 6.4 RC1 the third pre-release since the development of version 6.4 started in the beginning of June, 2019 ( See the release plan ). Since LibreOffice 6.4 Beta1 ( the previous pre-release ), 410 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 195 bugs have been fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 6.4 RC1 can be downloaded from here, it’s available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. ( Note that it will replace your actual installation )

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email address in order to create a new account ) so it can get fixed before LibreOffice 6.4 final is released.

For help, you can contact us directly in our IRC channel.

Happy testing!!

Download it now!

by x1sc0 at December 23, 2019 04:33 PM