The Document Foundation Planet

 

May 27, 2020

Official TDF Blog

Annual Report 2019: Native Language Projects – events around the world

(Note: this is a section from The Document Foundation’s Annual Report 2019, which will be published in full in the coming weeks.)

By helping to translate and market LibreOffice around the world, native language projects bring enthusiasm and passion to the global community. Here’s what they did in 2019…

Albania – Localisation sprint

Tirana, Albania’s capital city, was the host of the LibreOffice Conference 2018. Since then, the local community has been active in the design, marketing and localisation projects within LibreOffice. In November, the community had a localisation sprint, and one of the organisers, Sidorela Uku, described it so:

This was the first event I organized for LibreOffice, in collaboration with a friend of mine, Marcela Korreshi (our new contributor). The presentation included an introduction to LibreOffice and how people can contribute to the project in in various ways, while the second part was focused on translations. (In addition, I talked about whatcanidoforlibreoffice.org.) We had 14 people participating at the event, and as far as I can see from the translations, there are around 460 strings translated to review – and around 200 strings translated and reviewed.

Bulgaria – OpenFest

On November 2 and 3, the OpenFest 2019 took place in Sofia, Bulgaria, and Gabriele Ponzo from TDF’s Membership Committee was there. He said:

The goal of my mission was to create a local LibreOffice community, and possibly increase the membership base of TDF, having this country better represented. I’ve seen many people that were interested – so we’ll see if they will become active in our community. Also, I had the opportunity to share a booth with the wonderful guys from the openSUSE community. They were really kind and warm with me and helped in many ways, from coming to the airport to pick me, to talking about LibreOffice in Bulgarian to attendees of the booth, side-by-side with me who was doing it in English.

Canada – Building up the community

Canadian LibreOffice supporter Marc Paré set up LibreWaterloo, to “have a local presence on the Canadian scene with respect to the LibreOffice project and software. We would like to connect with local LibreOffice coders and users, and “to have fun” should be one of the pillars and principles we strive for.”

He continues: “I spoke at a meeting of the KW Non-Profit Sys Admin (KWNPSA) where I am a co-coordinator, and I announced the creation of the new LibreWaterloo community group. There, I did a two hour presentation on the status of The Document Foundation, along with LibreOffice and the benefits of starting a group. There were approximately 15 people at the meeting, and a couple of people came to trouble-shoot their software; however, the meeting was not to trouble-shoot issues, but to discuss if there was an interest from the Sys Admin group.”

Marc set up an organizing committee of three people to start with, and has plans for more events and localisation in Canada’s indigenous languages.

Czech Republic – Free software events

Members of the Czech LibreOffice community, including Stanislav Horáček, Zdeněk Crhonek and Petr valach, attended two conferences in autumn: LinuxDays in October, and OpenAlt in November. They had a booth with flyers, stickers and laptops demonstrating the latest version of LibreOffice, and answered questions from visitors.

Topics that visitors brought up included LibreOffice Online, macros, automatic updates, handwriting recognition and the Czech dictionary. Stanislav summarised his experiences: “We can really recommend these types of events, as you get feedback from both end users of our software, and developers/enthusiasts of another communities. Don’t hesitate to attend if there is a similar event in your country!”

France – Workshop and hackfests

Several events in France took place through the year – and all were hosted by Inno3 in Paris, a company thats specialises in open source licenses and supporting the French LibreOffice community.

There was a workshop in the middle of February, on a Saturday. Most of the attendees didn’t know each other in person, so the group decided to met at a restaurant near the corner to socialize a bit before working.

Then as an introduction, Sophie Gautier from TDF presented the different parts of the foundation, along with various projects relating to LibreOffice development. The group discussed localisation, quality assurance and programming. During the workshop, part of the group worked on localization and the other part on QA, confirming bugs and learning how to bibisect.

Germany – events and meetups

Germany and LibreOffice have a strong connection. StarOffice, the precursor to OpenOffice.org (which in turn was the precursor to LibreOffice), was first developed in Hamburg in the 1980s. Over the years, many other developers joined the team, in and around Hamburg and other parts of Germany. Even today, many years later, the German community is active, attending events and holding regular community calls.

One such event was the Chemnitzer Linux-Tage (Linux days) in Saxony, on March 16 and 17. While this event focused on the GNU/Linux operating system, community members from various FOSS projects were present. Stefan Unverricht, Thorsten Behrens and Mike Saunders had a stand with LibreOffice flyers, stickers, books and other merchandise – along with a PC to demonstrate the latest version of the suite.

Of course, most Linux users are well aware of LibreOffice, but there were still various questions on topics such as LibreOffice Online, document compatibility, translations, extensions and documentation. In addition, Stefan, Thorsten, Mike and Katarina Behrens gave talks about LibreOffice, The Document Foundation, and EGroupware integration with LibreOffice Online. Thorsten summarised the event: “It was very nice, with excellent talks, and a good spirit like the Paris Open Source Summit. The venue was lovely, while the talks were well attended. We should definitely go again next year!”

In May, members of the German community met at the Linuxhotel near Essen. 15 people took part, from across the LibreOffice project: developers, event organisers, infrastructure maintainers, documentation editors, and TDF team and board members. They discussed many topics, including: the structure of the German project; the various tools that we use (and how to consolidate them); and which events we should attend in the future. In addition, they created a list of tasks to focus on in the coming weeks and months, assigned to various members of the community.

Later in the year, on August 10 and 11, we attended FrOSCon 2019 in Sankt Augustin, a town just outside of Bonn. FrOSCon is one of the largest free and open source software (FOSS) conferences in the country, with around 2,000 attendees. Most of the visitors know about FOSS already, but some had only learnt about it recently, and were eager to discover more. Gerrit Großkopf, Uwe Altmann, Stefan Unverricht and Mike Saunders had a stand with flyers, stickers and a computer demonstrating LibreOffice 6.3 and LibreOffice Online. Indeed, many visitors to the stand had no idea that LibreOffice Online existed, and were eager to try it out on their own infrastructure.

Other common topics at the stand included LibreLogo, macros, mail merge and other features in the suite. We even had a couple of visitors who demonstrated minor bugs that they’d found in the software, which have been useful for creating bug reports. In addition to helping with the stand, Stefan gave a lecture about “LibreOffice Online in EGroupware”.

Japan – LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019

The LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019 was held on May 25 and 26 in at the Cyboze Office in Tokyo. Attendees from several Asian countries were present – including Japan, Taiwan and Indonesia – while some LibreOffice supporters made the trip over from Europe.

On the first day, Mark Hung from Taiwan gave the opening keynote, talking about bugs, fixes and success stories with LibreOffice in Asian languages. This was followed by talks in three tracks, one of which was in Japanese, and the other two in English. Talks included: educational practices in China; organising translation sprints for local languages; running LibreOffice in a factory; Collabora Online; and the new ODF toolkit from TDF.

On the second day, participants took part in a hackfest, business workshop, and certification reviews. Eric Sun, a TDF member and a candidate in the certification interview this time, won unanimous approvals from the committee and became a certified migration professional and professional trainer.

Nepal – Localisation event

On September 21, Software Freedom Day, the Nepalese LibreOffice community organised a localisation sprint at Kathmandu University. Sanjog Sigdel and Saroj Dhakal organised the event, and reported back: “14 new volunteers signed up. We presented the guidelines for doing the translations, and together we translated around 376 text strings into the Nepali language in an hour.”

Paraguay – First LibreOffice Latin America Conference

The LibreOffice Latin America Conference was the first event gathering LibreOffice users, advocates and contributors (not only in development, but also localization, PR/marketing, documentation, quality assurance, etc.) from different countries in Latin America, to exchange and share experiences and knowledge. It took place at the Facultad Politécnica de Universidad Nactional de Assunción (FPUNA) in Asunción, Paraguay, from July 18 – 20.

Linguistic challenges, women’s participation in FOSS, interoperability, professional training, migration, scripting and much more were hot topics in the conference. The event started internally on Thursday 18 with a translation sprint of the LibreOffice Guarani team. Then the event opened to the public on Friday 19, in a ceremony that gathered the Minister of the Secretariat of Linguistic Policies (SPL), Ladislaa Alcaraz de Silvero, Prof. Limpia Ferreira Ortiz, FP-UNA Vice-Dean, members of the Guaraní Culture Atheneum, Prof. Mag. Alcides Torres Gutt, Coordinator of the Translation Team together with Italo Vignoli and Gustavo Pacheco representing The Document Foundation and the LibreOffice Community.

Talks and workshops were held by speakers, members of the LibreOffice community, from Italy, Spain, Mexico, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Chile, Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay, from Thursday 18 to Saturday 20 of July at the Polytechnic Faculty of the National University of Asuncion in San Lorenzo campus.

Starting the afternoon, Henry Castro (Bolivia) talked on the development and technical challenges of LibreOffice Online. He was followed by José Gattica (Chile) talk on “Migration to LibreOffice in a vulnerable school”. Simultaneously, Mauricio Baeza (Mexico) gave the workshop on macros in the computer lab. Then Xiomara Céspedes talked about the migration to LibreOffice and open document formats at the University of Costa Rica. She was followed by Renato Barsotti (Argentina) experience of the Faculty of Economics of the National University of Misiones (UnaM).

The next morning, Olivier Hallot (Brazil) shared with the attendees the details about the importance of documenting the software. Simultaneously, Klaibson Ribeiro (Brazil) conducted the Calc workshop. The conference ended with feedback from the participating students and the general public about the knowledge presented at the conference and, in particular, the individual commitment to create a genuinely Paraguayan LibreOffice community and focus on translating the software into Guarani.

Spain – LibreOffice Conference 2019

Almeria in Spain was the host of the LibreOffice Conference 2019, which took place from September 10 – 13. Please see the separate Conference section of the report for all the details.

Turkey – Google Summer of Code presentation

The Google Summer of Code – aka GSoC – is a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. In 2019, LibreOffice was once again a participating project. Muhammet Kara from the Turkish LibreOffice community gave a presentation about GSoC on November 8 at YILDIZ Amphitheater M2, Hacettepe University (Beytepe Campus), Ankara. He said:

There were around 40 attendees, mostly from the Computer Science department. The best part was that they were very excited, and asked many questions – and the event took almost two hours instead of the planned 40 minutes. Many of them seemed ‘sold’ at the idea of spending the next summer (or at least one summer, sometime) working on LibreOffice or another free/libre open source software (FLOSS) project, through GSoC. I also tried to share my adventure as a FLOSS enthusiast, from a volunteer translator to a professional developer working as part of Collabora’s LibreOffice development team. And I am glad to say that they seemed inspired by the story.

Uganda – LibreOffice promotion and training

In September, Emmanuel Semutenga described his activities in Kampala for an interview on the TDF blog. He is a Project Manager at Kampabits, “a youth-based organization founded in 2010 that uses ICT multimedia creatively to improve the lives of less privileged youth from the non-formal settlements. It also creates safe spaces for persons with disabilities to freely express themselves while learning these in-demand skills.”

Kampabits also runs a “Women in Tech” project that trains 15 women in advanced coding skills, to make them employable, in a period of six months. This project focuses on women who have prior knowledge of computer basics.

Emmanuel uses free and open source software for all of the training, including LibreOffice, Gimp and various GNU/Linux distributions.

A big thanks to everyone in our worldwide community who helped to organise events, share knowledge and promote LibreOffice last year. Thanks to you, we’re reaching out to more people than ever before! If you’re reading this and want to help promote LibreOffice in your country or language see this page to get started.

by Mike Saunders at May 27, 2020 09:41 AM

Marius Popa Adrian

Mark Rotteveel and documentation team migrated the first documents to asciidoc

Mark Rotteveel and documentation team migrated the first documents to asciidoc – Docbuilding Howto https://www.firebirdsql.org/file/documentation/html/en/firebirddocs/docbuildhowto/firebird-docbuilding-howto.html – Docwriting Guide https://www.firebirdsql.org/file/documentation/html/en/firebirddocs/docwritehowto/firebird-docwriting-guide.html ps: Since May/June 2020, the Firebird

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at May 27, 2020 07:50 AM

May 25, 2020

Official TDF Blog

Community Member Monday: Rania Amina

To start with, tell us a bit about yourself!

Hi! I live in the Special Region of Yogyakarta, Indonesia, and work remotely on PT Sakti Kinerja Kolaborasindo (the office is in Bogor, West Java) as UI and Graphic Designer. Aside from being an active member of the Indonesian LibreOffice community, I am also one of the founders of the Gimpscape ID community (a design community focused on open source applications). Regarding hobbies – hmm, I have an interest in ancient manuscripts (Malay manuscripts), Kamen Rider, and really always enjoy detective, mystery, adventure, and comedy-themed drama films.

You can find me on Instagram, Twitter and Telegram.

Why did you decide to become a member of The Document Foundation?

The first reason is, because Ahmad Haris (he’s my boss in the office) “sudo’d” me to apply for membership :-) But to be honest, I was indeed very interested in becoming a member since the LibreOffice Conference Indonesia in Surabaya about two years ago.

By becoming a member, I think I can do things related to contributing to LibreOffice better than before. Being a member is a responsibility, in my opinion. Because it means I have to do my best from time to time for the LibreOffice community, both in Indonesia and outside. LibreOffice will get better if the community ecosystem is also good. Well, one of the tasks of members (in my mind) is to ensure that these communities can actively give feedback to LibreOffice, so that they can grow and develop better.

What are you working on right now?

At the moment I am still improving the LibreOffice Theme Changer extension (which I presented some time ago at FOSDEM), occasionally helping with translations, QA, managing Indonesian LibreOffice social media (Instagram, Twitter, and the blog), and inviting community members to learn how to be active contributors. For example, I invited two female members to work on two sets of icons named that we named Srikandi and LibreKids. Making these two icons is a form of learning to contribute to LibreOffice in terms of design.

When there isn’t too much work (both at office or at the university), I usually take time to create a video tutorial related to LibreOffice or other FOSS that I upload on my YouTube channel.

In addition, I and many other Asians (Haris, Frank, Shinji, Naruhiko, DaeHyun, and others) are currently spreading the spirit of Open Document format in the Asian region, through the LibreOffice Asia League.

Anything else you plan to do in the future? What does LibreOffice really need?

I really wanted to realize the LibreOffice for Kids task with Marina Latini – I heard she was one of the people who was also working on this topic. One of the reasons why LibreOffice is still less popular in Indonesia, compared to similar applications, is this: since elementary school, children have already been introduced to proprietary office applications.

I know that change cannot happen overnight, but if it does not start from now it will not happen for a thousand years. Therefore, with the presence of LibreOffice for Kids, I personally hope that this will be the first step to make next generation more familiar with LibreOffice.

One more thing, and with all respect and thanks to all LibreOffice developers: I think LibreOffice needs a team of marketing volunteers who can compare LibreOffice in order to compete with others. LibreOffice has great features that are very powerful, but it will be useless if not many people know about it. Short infographics or interesting videos about features, or working on a task with LibreOffice, will help a lot.

However, it should be underlined, that to be able to do this community support is needed, because it is the community that makes LibreOffice really what it is.

Indeed, as Rania says, everyone is welcome to join our community and help to make LibreOffice even stronger. See what you can do for LibreOffice – we look forward to meeting you!

by Mike Saunders at May 25, 2020 11:37 AM

Collabora Community

Collabora mentors students at GSoC 2020

Collabora developers are mentoring students during this year’s Google Summer of Code

Google Summer of Code is an amazing, international program encouraging the participation of university students in open source software development. It enables students to independently gain practical experience on concrete projects and matches them with experienced developers. This year a record number of almost 2000 students are taking part in the sponsored projects. Collabora is always delighted to support GSoC projects: some of our experienced developers are mentoring the students: guiding them in the code, encouraging them, and supporting the growth of their skills.

Collabora developers at GSoC 2020

For this year’s GSoC three students are being mentored by Collabora Productivity team members. Tomaž Vajngerl, Muhammet Kara, Miklos Vajna, and Michael Meeks are assisting the work on several projects around LibreOffice. But our  companies involvement is not just limited to that. Andrej Shadura, a developer from our parent company Collabora, is in charge of various projects around the Debian operating system. Our support of these Google Summer of Code reflects our commitment to open source software and is also a matter of personal attachment. Several of today’s Collaborans like Elie Tournier and Rohan Garg have successfully participated in the GSoC program in the past. So have the two now turned mentors Muhammet Kara and Miklos Vajna.

A success story – development camps in Turkey

The successful application of no less than six LibreOffice office projects for this year’s Summer of Code would not be fully told without mentioning some previous happenings in winter. Collabora Productivity had sponsored the LibreOffice Developer Bootcamp in Ankara and the LibreOffice Development Workshop at the Anadolu University in Eskişehir (Turkey) during the Free Software Wintercamp 2020. These ambitious development courses by Muhammad Kara spawned no less than three of the six successfully submitted LibreOffice projects of GSoC 2020. Find out more about the great outcome of these development camps within our community news blog post.

LibreOffice projects mentored by Collabora Productivity

The student Ahmad Ganzouri has successfully submitted two projects. Supported by the mentors Tomaž Vajngerl, Miklos Vajna, and Michael Meeks, he will work on a project adding blurry shadows to objects in LibreOffice and on a second one that aims to move the current gallery data in favour to easier to handle ZIP files. Yusuf Kenten, another participant of the LibreOffice Developers Bootcamp in Ankara, will be working on additions to better integrate extensions. Kenten’s project is being mentored by Collabora’s Muhammet Kara.

“Styles Inspector” and more noteworthy GSoC 2020 Projects

Another interesting GSoC project is bringing a CiviCRM integration to LibreOffice and Collabora Office. “Styles Inspector“, also mentored by Tomaž Vajngerl, is another project aimed at LibreOffice. We all look forward to the results of the students work. And for sure we will be covering them here. Collabora developer Andrej Shadura is mentoring no less than three projects focusing on Android SDK Tools for the Debian operating system. Find out more about these projects in the Collabora blog.

About Google Summer of Code

Google Summer of Code is a program awarding a three months stipend to students who successfully complete a free and open-source software coding project during the summer. The annual program started in 2005. This year, 199 organizations and 1199 student projects are taking part. Within the last 15 years more than 15.000 students from over 100 countries had been accepted. Developers from free and open source projects serve as mentors. Between 80 – 90% of the accepted projects get completed successfully.

The post Collabora mentors students at GSoC 2020 appeared first on Collabora Productivity.

by Marc Rodrigues at May 25, 2020 10:21 AM

May 22, 2020

May 21, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

New LibreOffice icons by Paulo José Amaro

Paulo José Amaro published a blog post about new LibreOffice icons. He said in our Telegram design channel: "I've just posted an article on my personal blog with an extensive recap of my new icons development. This is an old practice from the past decades that I enjoy doing, and it really helps me don't get lost in the changes. So thank you guys for allowing me to quote your comments. Please, feel free to ask me to remove anything, if you change your mind". Just follow by link below.


https://paulojose-brainstorm.blogspot.com/2020/05/libreoffice-new-2020-icons.html

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at May 21, 2020 04:48 PM

Official TDF Blog

LibreOffice 6.4.4 available for download

Berlin, May 21, 2020 – The Document Foundation announces the availability of LibreOffice 6.4.4, the 4th minor release of the LibreOffice 6.4 family, targeted at technology enthusiasts and power users. LibreOffice 6.4.4 includes many bug fixes and improvements to document compatibility.

LibreOffice 6.4.4 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is not optimized for enterprise-class deployments, where features are less important than robustness. Users wanting a more mature version can download LibreOffice 6.3.6, which includes some months of back-ported fixes.

For enterprise class deployments, TDF strongly recommends sourcing LibreOffice from one of the ecosystem partners, to get long-term supported releases, dedicated assistance, custom new features and other benefits, including SLAs (Service Level Agreements): https://www.libreoffice.org/download/libreoffice-in-business/. Also, the work done by ecosystem partners flows back into the LibreOffice project, benefiting everyone.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

Availability of LibreOffice 6.4.4

LibreOffice 6.4.4 is immediately available from the following link: https://www.libreoffice.org/download/. Minimum requirements are specified on the download page. TDF builds of the latest LibreOffice Online source code are available as Docker images: https://hub.docker.com/r/libreoffice/online/.

LibreOffice 6.4.4’s change log pages are available on TDF’s wiki: https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.4.4/RC1 (changed in RC1) and https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/6.4.4/RC2 (changed in RC2).

All versions of LibreOffice are built with document conversion libraries from the Document Liberation Project: https://www.documentliberation.org.

Support LibreOffice

LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://ask.libreoffice.org, where they can get and provide user-to-user support. People willing to contribute their time and professional skills to the project can visit the dedicated website at https://whatcanidoforlibreoffice.org.

LibreOffice users, free software advocates and community members can provide financial support to The Document Foundation with a donation via PayPal, credit card or other tools at https://www.libreoffice.org/donate.

by Italo Vignoli at May 21, 2020 11:11 AM

May 20, 2020

Official TDF Blog

Annual Report 2019: LibreOffice Conference

(Note: this is a section from The Document Foundation’s Annual Report 2019, which will be published in full in the coming weeks.)

The LibreOffice Conference is the annual gathering of the community, our end-users, developers, and everyone interested in free office software. Every year, it takes place in a different country and is supported by members of the LibreOffice commercial ecosystem.

In 2019, the conference was organized in Almeria by the Spanish community, and took place from Tuesday, September 10 to Friday, September 13. Most of the conference took place in the Universidad de Almeria, next to the sea, but some social events and meetups were held in the city itself.

Over 100 people from across the globe attended the conference; for several people, it was their first LibreOffice Conference and therefore the first time they could meet other community members in-person.

On Tuesday, before the main conference presentations got underway, there was a community meeting. Various members of the LibreOffice community joined for informal talks about marketing and localisation of the software, and what we can do to bring more people into the project.

Conference Tracks

Wednesday kicked off with the opening session: a welcome and introduction from the university’s staff; the “state of the project” (summarising the last 12 months of activity in LibreOffice); quick introductions to the TDF team, Board of Directors and Membership Committee; and messages from the sponsors.

During the conference, there were over 70 talks, workshops and feedback sessions on all manner of topics. Some talks focused on technical aspects, such as continuous integration, build systems and debugging, while others were geared towards the community and other non-technical matters – for instance, getting new contributors, how the Membership Committee works, and reports from events in Asia.

In addition, community members and developers gave talks about LibreOffice Online, the PDF export feature, SmartArt editing in Impress, reproducible builds, and a neural machine translation plugin for the suite. Videos of most of the presentations – and a quick summary of the whole conference – are available on TDF’s YouTube channel as a playlist:

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Additional Events

Outside of the conference tracks, various social events and meetups took place over the four days. On Tuesday evening we had a welcome party outside the accommodation, with drinks and light snacks. A beach dinner party was held on Wednesday, with more great local food to try, while a hackfest took place on Thursday, giving developers the opportunity to work shoulder-to-shoulder and discuss ideas in person.

On Friday, the conference organisers took us on a visit to the Alcazaba – the city’s castle – parts of which date back around 1,000 years. We had an entertaining guided tour with excellent views over the city as the sun set. Once the tour had finished, many people headed back into the city to sample tapas. Finally, on Saturday there was another guided tour, this time through the city’s historical downtown area.

So much of this was made possible thanks to your generous donations. If you find LibreOffice useful, support us with a donation so that we can continue to build our community, share knowledge, and improve LibreOffice for everyone!

by Mike Saunders at May 20, 2020 08:04 AM

May 19, 2020

Marius Popa Adrian

Firebird 4.0 Beta 2 release is available for testing

Firebird Project announces the second (and last) Beta release of Firebird 4.0, the next major version of the Firebird relational database, which is now available for testing on Windows and Linux platforms. This Beta release arrives with features and improvements already implemented by the Firebird development team, as well as with countless bugfixes. Our users are appreciated giving it a try and

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at May 19, 2020 12:20 PM

Roman Kuznetsov

Create a patch for LibreOffice directly in gerrit

Possibly, you are a great C++ developer or conversely you write your first strings in C++ and you want make LibreOffice better with pair (or more!) string of code.
Note, the same way uses for Help changes.
We'll suppose you already know what strings and in which file(s) of the LibreOffice source code you age going to change.
I'll talk here about using gerrit for that change making. 
So open your browser and type in address bar - gerrit.libreoffice.org. Click on SIGN IN in top right corner of the site. You'll see something like this:
For gerrit using you must have a TDF account, so just create it by that orange button ;-) Then login in to the site.
For making your change select Browse->Repositories on top of the site:

Then in the Filter field type one word "core" and click on link "core" in row below (if you want change Help, then type "help" instead "core" and click to "help"):
In left side of the site press Commands and then press CREATE CHANGE button by center of screen:
In opened window type in to Select branch for new change field word master and select "master" from drop-down list. Type something like tdf#bug_number <description> into Description area. Please use short description here, about only 75 characters on the first line; if you need a longer description, then add one empty line, and then add as many 75-character lines as you want. Press CREATE button.
Screen updates. Press EDIT in right top corner of the site:
There is a row with commands in right side of the site:
Press OPEN. In a new window type a name for file where you want make your change:
Please use a tooltip for selecting a full path to file! Click OPEN. It opens a source code editor:
Make your changes in the source code and click SAVE in right top site corner. Please wait, it shows a message like "All changes saved" in left bottom corner, then click CLOSE in right top site corner. You'll back to main site where you'll can see the changed file with your change. 
If your changes are in more than one file then just repeat operations from OPEN command as you need.
So, you made all your changes. Now you need someone who will review your patch. 
If you have a friend from LibreOffice developers (as me;-), then you can add it to reviewers directly. Click ADD REVIEWER in left side of the site and in first row of new window type his nickname or e-mail to add him in opening window. Then press START REVIEW there.
If you know nobody from LibreOffice developers then you can ask them to review your patch on #libreoffice-dev IRC channel in Freenode.net.
In that case click START REVIEW in main window and finally click PUBLISH EDIT in top right corner of the site.
Now you should just wait. You'll get one message from jenkins test bot and if it will be +1, then someone from developers should review the patch and set +2 and then will merge it to LibreOffice source code.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at May 19, 2020 07:28 AM

May 13, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: April 2020

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.4.3 was released on April, 16
  2. LibreOffice 6.3.6 was released on April, 30
  3. Ilmari Lauhakangas (TDF) published a couple of blogposts showing the progress done by the PPTX Team and the Macro Team in the last months
  4. Adolfo Jayme Barrientos and Steve Fanning made many Help improvements and cleanups
  5. Andreas Kainz continued to improve the galleries and dialog layouts. As a new task he took on improving Impress templates
  6. Rizal Muttaqin made many improvements in most of the icon themes and removed Tango icon theme from the core
  7. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) fixed import and export issues with PDF, SVG, HTML and DOCX. He also continued with padded numbering support in Writer
  8. Gábor Kelemen (NISZ) dropped Flash export filter and made many code cleanups
  9. Noel Grandin (Collabora) cleaned up the code in many places while improving readability
  10. Michael Weghorn fixed issues with the Android application and mail merge
  11. Luboš Luňák (Collabora) continued with the Skia engine integration and fixed a chart wizard freezing issue
  12. Justin Luth (SIL & Collabora) made many DOC/DOCX import improvements and did a lot of quality assurance work on DOC issues
  13. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed several chart label issues, related to both ODF and OOXML formats
  14. Samuel Mehrbrodt (CIB) fixed several OOXML-related issues, including one about remembering the last used file type
  15. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) continued the crucial user interface backend work and did many cleanups and crash fixes
  16. Mike Kaganski (Collabora) fixed some regressions and made many code cleanups
  17. László Németh (NISZ) fixed many issues with DOCX tables and numbered list formatting
  18. Xisco Faulí (TDF) added nearly 40 unit tests for old bug fixes and added and improved many UI tests. He also created a script that helps to identify missing unittests. Check this wiki page for more information
  19. Stephan Bergmann (Red Hat) made many cleanups, build fixes and UI test fixes
  20. Szabolcs Tóth and Regényi Balázs (NISZ) fixed several DOCX import and export issues related to shapes
  21. Eike Rathke (Red Hat) fixed some issues with Calc functions
  22. Heiko Tietze (TDF) implemented a brand new About dialog
  23. Michael Stahl (CIB) killed Python 2 support with fire and fixed some DOCX import and export issues
  24. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) did a lot of graphics handling improvements and cleanups
  25. Tor Lillqvist (Collabora) made improvements to debugging. He also made fixes and cleanups in code related to macOS and iOS
  26. Julien Nabet fixed exporting right-to-left content as HTML, the behaviour of Calc’s switch function, a problem with function wizard, an SQL parser issue and some crashes
  27. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) implemented chart axis position type property
  28. Pranam Lashkari (Collabora) fixed some issues with gradient fill
  29. Attila Bakos (NISZ) fixed some issues with graphical objects in DOCX files
  30. Tibor Nagy (NISZ) fixed a spacing issue with grouped shapes in DOCX files
  31. Thorsten Behrens (CIB) improved handling of JPEG images in the PDF export process
  32. Aditya Sahu added unit tests for creation of renaming, deletion of gallery theme
  33. Roman Kuznetsov fixed a couple of issues with scrolling in the Start Center
  34. Vasily Melenchuk (CIB) fixed a couple of issues with numbered lists in DOCX files
  35. Pavel Klevakin improved the time to import and export HTML files with images

Reported Bugs

780 bugs, 92 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 417 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. Telesto ( 139 )
  2. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 26 )
  3. andreas_k ( 26 )
  4. Mike Kaganski ( 17 )
  5. Regina Henschel ( 16 )
  6. Rizal Muttaqin ( 8 )
  7. Xisco Faulí ( 8 )
  8. Gerald Pfeifer ( 8 )
  9. Aron Budea ( 6 )
  10. sergio.callegari ( 5 )

Triaged Bugs

723 bugs have been triaged by 93 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Buovjaga ( 130 )
  2. Dieter ( 88 )
  3. Julien Nabet ( 55 )
  4. Heiko Tietze ( 49 )
  5. Xisco Faulí ( 43 )
  6. Timur ( 31 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 30 )
  8. m.a.riosv ( 28 )
  9. Telesto ( 21 )
  10. Aron Budea ( 21 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

661 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

218 bugs have been fixed by 40 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. andreas kainz ( 19 )
  2. Caolán McNamara ( 16 )
  3. Luboš Luňák ( 14 )
  4. Julien Nabet ( 12 )
  5. László Németh ( 9 )
  6. Justin Luth ( 9 )
  7. Rizal Muttaqin ( 7 )
  8. Michael Weghorn ( 6 )
  9. Miklos Vajna ( 5 )
  10. Balazs Varga ( 5 )

List of critical bugs fixed

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#130505 LibreOffice dialogs for save and open have default focus in the location field instead of file name field ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  2. tdf#131621 Crash saving template file (see comment 4) ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  3. tdf#131716 Freeze/hang after clicking Cancel in the Chart Wizard (with a large range of data selected) ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  4. tdf#131721 Skia rendering (Vulkan or Raster) crash when attempting to dragging a few columns of data ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  5. tdf#131729 IMAGE WRAP: Crash if you wrap an image with vertical position “Bottom + Page text area” ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  6. tdf#131907 Crash: reject/clear formatting ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  7. tdf#132097 Find Previous with direction columns crashes in specific condition ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  8. tdf#132278 crash after opening an old file ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  9. tdf#132282 FILEOPEN PPTX: Titles rendered vertically instead of horizontally ( Thanks to Xisco Fauli )
  10. tdf#132288 Spell check erases footnotes ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  11. tdf#132322 See log link is gone in new About Dialog 7.0 ( Thanks to Heiko Tietze )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#116243 App crash after click in Header or Footer on Writer ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  2. tdf#126828 Variables having assigned objects from closed components pretend to still be valid. Attempts to inspect them in the IDE cause crashes. ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  3. tdf#128662 LibreOffice crashed when receiving certain WebDAV error responses ( Thanks to Julian Kalinowski )
  4. tdf#129372 FILEOPEN: PPTX: CRASH: File format error found at SfxBaseModel::storeToStorage: 0x20d(row,col) – works w/ PowerPoint 2013 ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  5. tdf#130685 CRASH: after pasting and undoing (change tracking involved) ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  6. tdf#131195 Android Viewer crashes when pressing back while loading document ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  7. tdf#131613 Crash after object rename from Navigator ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  8. tdf#131621 Crash saving template file (see comment 4) ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  9. tdf#131663 CRASH: Crash while inserting large PNG image (SKIA) ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  10. tdf#131684 Crash when doing undoing ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  11. tdf#131715 Crash clicking on Data range in the Chart Wizard twice/three times ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  12. tdf#131721 Skia rendering (Vulkan or Raster) crash when attempting to dragging a few columns of data ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  13. tdf#131729 IMAGE WRAP: Crash if you wrap an image with vertical position “Bottom + Page text area” ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  14. tdf#131767 Crash when opening mail merge wizard for attached doc ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  15. tdf#131907 Crash: reject/clear formatting ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  16. tdf#131939 Crash on File Exit (SKIA) ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  17. tdf#132001 FILEOPEN DOCX CRASH: File fails to open with frame in header and change tracked table ( Thanks to László Németh )
  18. tdf#132051 Crash with Skia when resize Draw window (debug build) ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  19. tdf#132097 Find Previous with direction columns crashes in specific condition ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  20. tdf#132143 CRASH using Ctrl+End in Object Catalog ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  21. tdf#132210 [1] Calc crashes when I close spreadsheet file ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  22. tdf#132278 crash after opening an old file ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  23. tdf#132335 Skia: Crash with starting slideshow of presentation based on template “Blue Curve” ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  24. tdf#132367 Skia: Crash with presenter console ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#131496 Presentation opens slower than before ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  2. tdf#131716 Freeze/hang after clicking Cancel in the Chart Wizard (with a large range of data selected) ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  3. tdf#131951 FILEOPEN: Quadratic time on reading and converting html files with images ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  4. tdf#132388 BASIC: Replace is awfully slow ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#73056 FILEOPEN: Non-global Table Row Margins of MS WORD 97-2003 DOC are only implemented for 1st Cell of Row. ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  2. tdf#78749 [FILEOPEN]: DOCX import filter loses the frame’s (object’s) background bitmap ( Thanks to Attila Bakos )
  3. tdf#79426 Macros: Passing an error object to a function causes a run time error. ( Thanks to Andreas Heinisch )
  4. tdf#79553 FILEOPEN: Incorrect spacing between numbers and lines when opening a .doc file ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  5. tdf#91565 REPORT BUILDER: Missing insert field icon in Add Field dialog ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  6. tdf#91818 UI: Start Centre Recent Files allows mouse wheel scroll when there is no scroll bar ( Thanks to Roman Kuznetsov )
  7. tdf#95425 Number format of data labels reset when format of data series is changed ( Thanks to Balazs Varga )
  8. tdf#96760 Android: Viewer cannot open odp file with video inserted ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  9. tdf#99197 Rendering error of punctuation mark in Word document. ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  10. tdf#99674 Add IDEF diagram shapes to gallery ( Thanks to andreas kainz )

WORKSFORME bugs

107 bugs have been retested by 29 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Buovjaga ( 28 )
  2. Michael Weghorn ( 11 )
  3. Julien Nabet ( 10 )
  4. Jean-Baptiste Faure ( 8 )
  5. Dieter ( 6 )
  6. Heiko Tietze ( 5 )
  7. Roman Kuznetsov ( 5 )
  8. Aron Budea ( 5 )
  9. Xisco Faulí ( 4 )
  10. Timur ( 4 )

DUPLICATED bugs

148 bugs have been duplicated by 36 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Justin L ( 19 )
  2. Timur ( 17 )
  3. Buovjaga ( 16 )
  4. V Stuart Foote ( 13 )
  5. Dieter ( 8 )
  6. Xisco Faulí ( 8 )
  7. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 7 )
  8. Telesto ( 5 )
  9. eisa01 ( 5 )
  10. Lubos Lunak ( 5 )

Verified bug fixes

66 bugs have been verified by 12 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 48 )
  2. Regina Henschel ( 4 )
  3. Justin L ( 3 )
  4. Michael Weghorn ( 2 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 2 )
  6. V Stuart Foote ( 1 )
  7. Jürgen Kirsten ( 1 )
  8. Timur ( 1 )
  9. Jim Raykowski ( 1 )
  10. raal ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

411 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 32 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. Dieter ( 103 )
  2. Telesto ( 56 )
  3. Aron Budea ( 44 )
  4. Roman Kuznetsov ( 41 )
  5. Buovjaga ( 27 )
  6. Heiko Tietze ( 22 )
  7. Rizal Muttaqin ( 15 )
  8. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 12 )
  9. Thomas Lendo ( 12 )
  10. V Stuart Foote ( 11 )

Regression Bugs

86 bugs have been set as regressions by 20 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 21 )
  2. Telesto ( 18 )
  3. Timur ( 8 )
  4. Buovjaga ( 7 )
  5. Aron Budea ( 6 )
  6. Dieter ( 5 )
  7. Justin L ( 3 )
  8. Oliver Brinzing ( 3 )
  9. Jan-Marek Glogowski ( 2 )
  10. David ( 2 )

Bisected Bugs

57 bugs have been bisected by 11 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 20 )
  2. Buovjaga ( 8 )
  3. Attila Baraksó (NISZ) ( 7 )
  4. Aron Budea ( 5 )
  5. Justin L ( 4 )
  6. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 4 )
  7. raal ( 4 )
  8. Telesto ( 2 )
  9. Michael Stahl (CIB) ( 1 )
  10. Michael Weghorn ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of

by x1sc0 at May 13, 2020 03:50 PM

May 12, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

LibreOffice 7.0 Alpha1 is ready for testing

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 7.0 Alpha1 is ready for testing!

LibreOffice 7.0 will be released as final at the beginning of August, 2020 ( Check the Release Plan ) being LibreOffice 7.0 Alpha1 the first pre-release since the development of version 7.0 started in the beginning of June, 2019. Since then, 6213 commits have been submitted to the code repository and more than 1200 bugs set to FIXED in Bugzilla. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice.

LibreOffice 7.0 Alpha1 can be downloaded from here for Linux, MacOS and Windows, and it can be installed alongside the standard version.

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email account in order to create a new account ).

For help, you can contact the QA Team directly in the QA IRC channel or via Telegram.

LibreOffice is a volunteer-driven community project, so please help us to test – we appreciate it!

Happy testing!!

Download it now!

by x1sc0 at May 12, 2020 06:00 PM

Collabora Community

Online development CI accessible via the internet

It’s now easier to check the status of your /libreoffice/online patches

Recently the CI (continuous integration) infrastructure for Online has been made accessible via the internet. Now developers from outside Collabora can directly check the status of their patches and builds.

 

Already for a while there was a Jenkins instance that checks patches on gerrit for the online-project (and our other projects), before they are submitted to cgit.freedesktop.org/libreoffice/online/
This service is now running on dedicated hardware, what allows us to make it accessible directly from the internet. Links pointing to this server in TDF gerrit will work from now on.

 

How to participate in the project

This growing  access to our development makes it easier to join the project. Which we of course encourage 🙂  Therefore… read more about participating in developing LibreOffice online here!

If you have any questions, please leave a message here.

The post Online development CI accessible via the internet appeared first on Collabora Productivity.

by Cor Nouws at May 12, 2020 02:36 PM

May 11, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-05-11 Monday

  • Planning call, E-mail left & right; pleased to see the nice Demo Servers to make it much easier for people to try out an integration using any server, with more easy integrations coming.
  • Plugged away at admin & E-mail much of the day until late; Mondays!

May 11, 2020 09:00 PM

Mike Kaganski

Glow effect on objects in LibreOffice

Thanks to SUSE who made this possible, now we have glow effect on objects in upcoming LibreOffice 7.0. Collabora Productivity engineers Tamás Bunth and myself together have implemented it for shapes and pictures.

Below are some screenshots of a PPTX slide with glow samples collected from the relevant bug report:

How it was in 6.4
How it looks like in master towards 7.0
Reference look

What puzzles me is why fontworks’ (right bottom) glow is not shown in the reference, although the effect is present in its properties. Somehow now LibreOffice seems to support glow in fontworks better 😉

Glow on pictures is only implemented in Impress and Draw. Glow on shapes is available in all modules.

by mikekaganski at May 11, 2020 10:17 AM

May 10, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-05-10 Sunday

  • Up late, relaxed, sung & had a sermon later, Pizza lunch, out for a walk around a nearby golf-course; Parks & Rec.

May 10, 2020 09:00 PM

May 09, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-05-09 Saturday

  • Lots of tidying, cleaning, chiseled tarmac out of the sideway threshold. Fitted brass slides turned by N. and M. to velux blind with new string, works like a charm. Walked with babes.

May 09, 2020 09:00 PM

May 08, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-05-08 Friday

  • Partner call, staff call, TDF board call, finally a bit of hackery. Lock, Stock & 2 Smoking Barrels.

May 08, 2020 09:00 PM

Miklos Vajna

Export larger pages from Draw using PDF 1.6

Draw/Impress now has support for exporting larger page sizes into PDF. The previous limit was 200 " (508 cm), and now practically there is no such limit.

First, thanks Vector who made this work by Collabora possible.

Motivation

You can use Draw with a document which has a single page, which more or less acts as a canvas with unlimited size to handle vector graphics. The current limit of such a canvas in size is 600 x 600 cm. (And that can be increased further if there is demand without too large problems.)

Exporting such a document to PDF is a different matter, though. The specification (up to, and including version 1.5) says that the unit to specify sizes is points, and the maximum allowed value is 14 400. This means that there is no markup to describe that your page is 600 cm wide. PDF 1.6 (and newer versions) introduce a UserUnit markup to allow unlimited page size, and now Draw (and other apps) can use this to describe the increased size.

Another use-case can be a large sheet in Calc, exporting it to a single PDF page, so you can pan around easily on a touch device. If you have enough rows, then getting rid of this limit is helpful to deal with the large page height.

Results so far

Here is how a large page looks like now in Draw and then in Adobe Reader:

Figure 1. Export of 6m-wide.odg to PDF

You can see how both Draw and Adobe Reader show that the page width is larger than 200 ".

How is this implemented?

If you would like to know a bit more about how this works, continue reading… :-)

  • The PDF export already converts from an internal unit (e.g. Draw uses 100th millimeters, Writer uses twips) to PDF’s unit

  • The trick is that now PDF’s unit is no longer points all the time, but we can dynamically switch to a larger unit as needed.

Here is how the PDF markup looks like for a 600 cm wide page:

1 0 obj
<</Type/Page/Parent 4 0 R/Resources 11 0 R/MediaBox[0 0 8503.93700787402 396]
/UserUnit 2/Group<</S/Transparency/CS/DeviceRGB/I true>>/Contents 2 0 R>>
endobj

Notice how we still avoid values larger than 14 400, but now the UserUnit says that 1 unit means 2 points.

Want to start using this?

You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release too (7.0).

by Miklos Vajna at May 08, 2020 07:02 AM

May 07, 2020

Michael Meeks

2020-05-07 Thursday

  • Partner call, legal call, managed to get a good few fixes and improvements worked on until late.

May 07, 2020 09:00 PM

May 06, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

Updated branding in LibreOffice's 7.0 windows installer

So, I just show you two screenshots with current view of LibreOffice's 7.0 windows installer:

Looks nice.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at May 06, 2020 07:27 PM

April 25, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

How to install Glade on macOS

Possible you need Glade, but you use macOS and won't change your OS or use any virtual machine. You can install Glade on your macOS using Homebrew. Three simple steps:
Open a Terminal.
Enter a first command: /bin/bash -c "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install.sh)"
It will download and install Homebrew on your macOS. 
Note, you should be enter your admin password two or three time during that process.
After end of Homebrew installing enter a second command: brew install glade.
So now you can start Glade with command glade in the Terminal.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at April 25, 2020 07:09 PM

April 24, 2020

Roman Kuznetsov

Branding change in LibreOffice 7.0

It's still WIP, but I can show you pair of images with a new branding in LibreOffice 7.0. And you can look at it yourself when you'll download a current daily build by link.
So a first image is new the About dialog:
And a second image is the Start Center (empty):
Looks nice for me=) Thanks to our designers for it.

by Roman Kuznetsov (noreply@blogger.com) at April 24, 2020 03:27 PM

April 23, 2020

Tamas Zolnai

Cypress basics: how do cypress tests work?

Introduction

As I wrote earlier in a blogpost now we have cypress.io test framework integrated into Collabora Online codebase. Since we are testing an online, Javascript-based application that means we are working in an asynchronous environment. So triggering a user event via this framework, does not mean that this event is actually finished at the same time when the related cypress method is called. On the other hand, we try to cover real user scenarios, which are usually a sequence of events, as the user doing things on the UI step-by-step. So the question is, how to write sequential tests in an asynchronous environment. Fortunately, cypress has the answer to that.

The problem of asynchronicity

First, let's see an example of simulating user events in the cypress test framework. The following code triggers a selection of the text by simulating CTRL+A shortcut:

// Select all text
cy.get('textarea.clipboard')
.type('{ctrl}a')

With calling this method we trigger a keyboard input, which will be handled by the client code (loleaflet). The client JS code sends a message to the server about the keyboard input. On the server-side, we will execute the shortcut, which results in a text selection. Then the server will send back the new text selection to the client-side, which will display it for the user. However the cy.get().type() call won't wait for that, it just triggers the event on the client-side and moves on.

Why is it a problem? Let's extend this code with another event:

// Select all text
cy.get('textarea.clipboard')
.type('{ctrl}a')

// Apply bold font
cy.get('#tb_editbar_item_bold')
.click();

Let's assume that this '#tb_editbar_item_bold' item exists. It's a toolbar button which applies bold font on the selected text. The problem here is that the selection is not finished yet when we already triggered the font change. Triggering these events does not mean that they will be executed in the specified order. Both events are handled in an asynchronous way, so if the first event (e.g. typing) takes more time to execute, then it will be finished later. Which means the application won't apply bold font on anything, because text selection is not there yet.

Event-indicator method

What is the solution here? What we need is the event-indicator method. It's very simple. After every event, we trigger in the test code, we should use an indicator that the event is actually processed. Let's see how we can fix the previous scenario:

// Select all text
cy.get('textarea.clipboard')
.type('{ctrl}a')

// Wait for the text selection to appear
cy.get('.leaflet-marker-icon')
.should('exist');

// Apply bold font
cy.get('#tb_editbar_item_bold')
.click();

The '.leaflet-marker-icon' DOM element is part of the text selection markup in the application, so we can use that as an indicator. In cypress, every cy.get().should() call has an implicit retry feature. It tries to get the related DOM element, again and again, until it appears in the DOM (or until a given timeout). Also, it tries to check the assumption described by the should() method, again and again, until the DOM properties meet with this assumption (or until a given timeout). So this specific cy.get().should() call will wait until the selection appears on the client-side. After that, it's safe to apply bold font because we have the selection to apply on. It's a best practice to use an indicator after every event, so you can make sure that the events are processed in the right order.

Bad pracitice

Someone might think of using some kind of waiting after a simulated event, so the application has time to finish the processing. Like bellow:

// Select all text
cy.get('textarea.clipboard')
.type('{ctrl}a')

// Wait for the text selection to appear (DONT USE THIS)
cy.wait(500);

// Apply bold font
cy.get('#tb_editbar_item_bold')
.click();

I think it's easy to see why this is not effective. If this constant time is too small, then this test will fail on slower machines or on the same machine when it's overloaded. On the other side, if this constant is too big, then the test will be slow. So if we use a big enough value to make the tests passing on all machines, then these tests will be as slow as they would be on the slowest machine.

Using an indicator makes the test framework more effective. Running these tests will be faster on faster machines since it waits only until the indicator is found in the DOM, which is fast in this case. It also works on slower machines since we have a relatively big timeout for cypress commands (6000 ms), so it's not a problem if it takes time to apply the selection. All in all, we should try to minimize the usage of cy.wait() method in our test code.

One more thing: then() is not an indicator

It's good to know, that not every cypress command can be used as an indicator. For example, we often use then() method, which yields the selected DOM element, so we can work with that item in the test code. An example of this is the following, where we get a specific &ltp> item and try to check whether it has the specified text content:

cy.get('#copy-paste-container p')
.then(function(item) {
expect(item).to.have.lengthOf(1);
expect(item[0].innerText).to.have.string('\u00a0');
});

This method call will retry getting the &ltp> element until it appears in the DOM. However, it won't retry the assumptions specified with expect methods. It will check these expectations only once, when it gets the &ltp> item first. If we would like to wait for the &ltp> item to match with the assumptions, then we should use should() method instead.

cy.get('#copy-paste-container p')
.should('contain.text', '\u00a0');

This method will retry to find a &ltp> item meet both the selector('#copy-paste-container p') and the assumption. In general, it's always better to use a should() method where it possible. However sometimes then() is also needed. We can use that safely if we use an indicator before it and so we can make sure we check the DOM element at the right time.

In the example below, we have a cy.get('.blinking-cursor') call. If we know that before the text selection we did not have the blinking cursor, then this cy.get() call is a good indicator so we can use then() after that safely.

// Select all text
cy.get('textarea.clipboard')
.type('{ctrl}a')

// Use blinking cursor position
cy.get('.blinking-cursor')
.then(function(cursors) {
var posX = cursors[0].getBoundingClientRect().left;
... // Do something with this position
})

Summary

I hope this short description of the event-indicator method and cypress retry feature is useful to understand how these cypress tests work. This simple rule, to always use indicators, can make things much easier when somebody writes new tests or modifies the existing ones. Sometimes the application does not provide us an obvious indicator and we need to be creative to find one.

by Tamás Zolnai (noreply@blogger.com) at April 23, 2020 11:25 PM

April 12, 2020

Andreas Kainz

Network gallery style

What do you prefer black/gold or blue/blue? The user can change the line color, area color and shadow color (highlight color) so with 3 clicks you can switch, but I prefer a good default.

please comment your feedback.

by kdeonlinux at April 12, 2020 07:01 PM

April 09, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: March 2020

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.4.2 was announced on March, 19
  2. Luca Carlon and Jan-Marek Glogowski introduced basic HiDPI scale for Qt5 in LibreOffice (tdf#127687)
  3. Mark Hung improved Impress/Draw table perfomance (tdf#120216)
  4. Seth Chaiklin, Sophia Schröder, Adolfo Jayme Barrientos and Steve Fanning made many Help improvements and cleanups
  5. Ilmari Lauhakangas and Olivier Hallot updated some menu references in Help
  6. Samuel Thibault (Hypra) improved accessibility testing and functionality
  7. László Németh (NISZ) fixed many DOCX table issues
  8. Xisco Fauli (TDF) created a new QA related easyhack to convert UItests to CppunitTest. Some UItests are not used to test UI elements. Converting them to CppunitTests makes them to run faster and on more platforms. UITests are only run on Linux
  9. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) continued the crucial user interface backend work and did many cleanups and crash fixes
  10. Eike Rathke (Red Hat) improved named ranges and function wizard
  11. Andreas Kainz improved context menus, updated the Area Fill presets, arrows gallery, bullets, added a new gallery for Business Process Model and Notation. He also created a new icon gallery as an extension. See link 1, link 2 and link 3
  12. Jun Nogata created new fontwork styles
  13. Muhammet Kara (Collabora) made it easy to work on LibreOffice in the Gitpod online IDE service
  14. Tor Lillqvist (Collabora) worked on iOS app improvements
  15. Serge Krot (CIB) fixed issues with linked document handling in Writer and Calc
  16. Jim Raykowski continued improving the Navigator and fixed an issue with pasting list content after undo
  17. Noel Grandin (Collabora) cleaned up the code in many places, made XML parsing faster in general and improved the loading time of XLSX files with a huge number of images
  18. Stephan Bergmann (Red Hat) made many cleanups and raised Windows build baseline to Visual Studio 2019 16.4
  19. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) fixed an issue with links in presentations exported as PDF and added support for padded numbering in Writer
  20. Justin Luth (SIL & Collabora) fixed calculations of subscript positions and improved handling of image wrapping and tables in Writer
  21. Michael Stahl (CIB) worked on some convoluted DOCX interoperability issues concerning section breaks, bookmarks and linked images
  22. Luboš Luňák (Collabora) made it so font rendering now uses Skia engine
  23. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed many chart label issues
  24. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) added a feature for showing legends without overlapping the chart and fixed several issues with legends
  25. Rizal Muttaqin made many improvements in most of the icon themes
  26. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) improved PDF import support and made many internal improvements to the graphics code
  27. Michael Weghorn made dozens of improvements to the Android application
  28. Julien Nabet made several improvements to the Firebird database support and did code cleanups
  29. Armin Le Grand improved EMF+ support and made several fixes related to graphics
  30. Gülşah Köse (Collabora) fixed an issue with Advance Timing of presentations
  31. Bartosz Kosiorek fixed a bunch of EMF+ issues
  32. Samuel Mehrbrodt (CIB) added an options to disallow opening files locked by other users and to prevent disabling read-only mode, improved screen size detection and fixed an issue with OLE object heights
  33. Björn Michaelsen continued renovating Writer memory management
  34. Jan Holešovský (Collabora) improved the Android application and inserting of PDFs as images
  35. Marco Cecchetti (Collabora) made it so inserted images are automatically rotated based on their EXIF orientation data
  36. Jussi Pakkanen converted some Perl scripts to Python while experimenting with Meson build system

Reported Bugs

695 bugs, 85 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 378 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. Telesto ( 36 )
  2. Xisco Faulí ( 32 )
  3. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 26 )
  4. Mike Kaganski ( 17 )
  5. Regina Henschel ( 14 )
  6. andreas_k ( 11 )
  7. Rizal Muttaqin ( 10 )
  8. Steve Fanning ( 10 )
  9. Timur ( 10 )
  10. sdc.blanco ( 8 )

Triaged Bugs

621 bugs have been triaged by 81 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 133 )
  2. Dieter ( 69 )
  3. Timur ( 52 )
  4. Julien Nabet ( 41 )
  5. Heiko Tietze ( 39 )
  6. V Stuart Foote ( 25 )
  7. Oliver Brinzing ( 23 )
  8. Roman Kuznetsov ( 18 )
  9. m.a.riosv ( 18 )
  10. Michael Weghorn ( 14 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

561 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

205 bugs have been fixed by 50 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. Caolán McNamara ( 17 )
  2. Julien Nabet ( 16 )
  3. László Németh ( 8 )
  4. Noel Grandin ( 7 )
  5. Balazs Varga ( 6 )
  6. Justin Luth ( 6 )
  7. Eike Rathke ( 6 )
  8. Samuel Mehrbrodt ( 5 )
  9. Jim Raykowski ( 5 )
  10. Michael Weghorn ( 5 )

List of critical bugs fixed

  1. tdf#117088 FILEOPEN: Some labels in charts are not displayed by default ( Thanks to Balazs Varga )

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#130746 Writer crashes when Alt+Arrow Up keys are pressed within a table row spanning two pages ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  2. tdf#130878 Report does not show label-fields when run in 7.0 ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  3. tdf#131041 CRASH: when I try set border for page header ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  4. tdf#131096 Calc crashes when viewing details of two Statistical functions in Function Wizard ( Thanks to Eike Rathke )
  5. tdf#131208 Crash on double click to paragraph style ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  6. tdf#131380 Crash when opening xlsx file, FILEOPEN ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  7. tdf#59274 FILEOPEN: table in DOCX file is more narrower than it should be (fix AutoFit Table Layout with incomplete grids) ( Thanks to László Németh )
  8. tdf#80635 FILEOPEN: DOC file floating table spacing (margin) not imported properly ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  9. tdf#84399 FILEOPEN: DOCX drawing canvas error (wrong size and text wrapping option imported) ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  10. tdf#95854 Insert comment shortcut doesn’t let me edit existing comment ( Thanks to Maxim Monastirsky )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#118893 CRASH Impress: UI locks up when I drag a slide from the left “Slides” view to the Windows taskbar ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  2. tdf#130680 CRASH: cutting content of document ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  3. tdf#130746 Writer crashes when Alt+Arrow Up keys are pressed within a table row spanning two pages ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  4. tdf#131015 CRASH: using the pipette in Edit Contour dialog ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  5. tdf#131041 CRASH: when I try set border for page header ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#131096 Calc crashes when viewing details of two Statistical functions in Function Wizard ( Thanks to Eike Rathke )
  7. tdf#131164 EDITING: Base Crashes on Tools>User Administration… (Firebird) ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  8. tdf#131179 Android Viewer crashes trying to open document containing comments ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  9. tdf#131208 Crash on double click to paragraph style ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  10. tdf#131210 UI: Language Options: editing ‘Date acceptance patterns’ crashes whole application (gtk3) ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  11. tdf#131248 Crash when closing SQL Edit Query (gtk3 only) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  12. tdf#131273 Crash when pasting quotes with fixed width ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  13. tdf#131380 Crash when opening xlsx file, FILEOPEN ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  14. tdf#131389 Crash when clearing table background color from sidebar (GTK3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  15. tdf#131464 Crash when trying to create an index of Writer in Japanese locale ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  16. tdf#131507 FILEOPEN: CRASH at import time ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  17. tdf#131533 Qt5 crash when closing LO with a 2nd consecutive selection ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  18. tdf#131553 A PPTX with SmartArt shapes crashes Impress ( Thanks to nd101)
  19. tdf#131571 Crash when clicking the “Text direction from top to bottom” toolbar icon ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  20. tdf#131712 Base EDITING Crash on SQL select command or double click on table with non null float field – mysql native connector (mariadb) ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#131185 LO Writer “hangs” on scrolling/saving of a document where embedded image doesn’t exist ( Thanks to Gülşah Köse )
  2. tdf#131530 FILEOPEN: Hang at import time ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  3. tdf#93831 FILEOPEN XLSX Slow to open ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#36737 default values of string type and object type for optional parameters are not processed ( Thanks to Andreas Heinisch )
  2. tdf#59274 FILEOPEN: table in DOCX file is more narrower than it should be (fix AutoFit Table Layout with incomplete grids) ( Thanks to László Németh )
  3. tdf#61274 PDF EXPORT Links are off by one page if presentation includes (unexported) hidden slides. ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  4. tdf#75330 EDITING: “Show the legend without overlapping the chart” ( Thanks to Tünde Tóth )
  5. tdf#80194 Impress: Default value for ‘Raise/lower by’ in Subscript not proper ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  6. tdf#80635 FILEOPEN: DOC file floating table spacing (margin) not imported properly ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  7. tdf#84399 FILEOPEN: DOCX drawing canvas error (wrong size and text wrapping option imported) ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  8. tdf#89849 Unify superscript and subscript behaviour between apps ( Thanks to Justin Luth )
  9. tdf#89901 Insertion of DXF image fail to produce a correct image ( Thanks to Armin Le Grand )
  10. tdf#93831 FILEOPEN XLSX Slow to open ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  11. tdf#95854 Insert comment shortcut doesn’t let me edit existing comment ( Thanks to Maxim Monastirsky )

WORKSFORME bugs

73 bugs have been retested by 32 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Aron Budea ( 11 )
  2. Timur ( 8 )
  3. Michael Weghorn ( 7 )
  4. Xisco Faulí ( 4 )
  5. Buovjaga ( 4 )
  6. Oliver Grimm ( 4 )
  7. Samuel Mehrbrodt (CIB) ( 4 )
  8. Dieter ( 3 )
  9. b. ( 2 )
  10. Roman Kuznetsov ( 2 )

DUPLICATED bugs

157 bugs have been duplicated by 29 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Timur ( 45 )
  2. Xisco Faulí ( 25 )
  3. V Stuart Foote ( 8 )
  4. Heiko Tietze ( 7 )
  5. Dieter ( 7 )
  6. Aron Budea ( 7 )
  7. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 7 )
  8. Julien Nabet ( 7 )
  9. Oliver Brinzing ( 5 )
  10. Justin L ( 4 )

Verified bug fixes

93 bugs have been verified by 16 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 50 )
  2. Dieter ( 15 )
  3. Timur ( 8 )
  4. Roman Kuznetsov ( 4 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 3 )
  6. Justin L ( 2 )
  7. Michael Weghorn ( 2 )
  8. Buovjaga ( 2 )
  9. V Stuart Foote ( 1 )
  10. Stephan Bergmann ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

338 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 36 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. Dieter ( 108 )
  2. Roman Kuznetsov ( 75 )
  3. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 18 )
  4. Xisco Faulí ( 16 )
  5. Thomas Lendo ( 14 )
  6. sdc.blanco ( 14 )
  7. Heiko Tietze ( 12 )
  8. Rizal Muttaqin ( 12 )
  9. Justin L ( 11 )
  10. Aron Budea ( 5 )

Regression Bugs

87 bugs have been set as regressions by 17 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 52 )
  2. Timur ( 10 )
  3. Oliver Brinzing ( 4 )
  4. Dieter ( 4 )
  5. Cor Nouws ( 3 )
  6. Aron Budea ( 3 )
  7. Buovjaga ( 1 )
  8. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 1 )
  9. Roman Kuznetsov ( 1 )
  10. Justin L ( 1 )

Bisected Bugs

79 bugs have been bisected by 10 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 52 )
  2. Timur ( 10 )
  3. Aron Budea ( 7 )
  4. Oliver Brinzing ( 3 )
  5. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 2 )
  6. raal ( 1 )
  7. Justin L ( 1 )
  8. Samuel Mehrbrodt (CIB) ( 1 )
  9. Michael Weghorn ( 1 )
  10. Mike Kaganski ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of Open bibisectRequests

Check the current list of open bibisectrequests here

Evolution of Highest Priority Bugs

Check the current list of highest …

by x1sc0 at April 09, 2020 04:20 PM

April 08, 2020

Miklos Vajna

Padded numbering in Writer, part 2

I already posted about the start of padded numbering support in Writer, there the focus was to insert 0 characters to pad up the result to 2 characters. Let’s see how that got extended in the recent past…

First, thanks Nicolas Christener who made this work by Collabora possible.

Motivation

Padded numbering is a style where you insert 0 characters in front of an otherwise normal (Arabic) numbering, making sure that the result always has at least N characters. Up to now, you had to number your content manually to have this effect, while Word supports this feature.

OOXML supports padding up to 2, 3, 4 and 5 characters. The news is now now it’s possible to not only pad up to 2 characters, but also to any number between 2 and 5.

Results so far

Here is how the current rendering of padded numbering looks like, with a custom prefix and suffix:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/JHqkVdHkLLkFV1Mrh5jR1FFqq8PvU3lmjuOrl6SwBnM-ygsbugL-FccMHIod9Uyj2-hAyADRX7VwozUHgzBTZTdo72FB_nuHzEH-iQngSl5ND0o6h1sZDTs1uv8H5cLNv0cHDgRv2A=w640
Figure 1. numbering-padded4.docx, current rendering

You can see how 0 is inserted before 999, but not before 1000 as this is the pad-to-4 case.

How is this implemented?

If you would like to know a bit more about how this works, continue reading… :-)

  • Padding to a custom number is not something that works in general, because both ODF and OOXML has a separate number format for each padding. So Writer supports the 4 cases Word supports, but (for now) not more.

  • Padding to 3 or more is more complicated than pad to 2, because OOXML has different markups for them.

Here is how the pad-to-2 markup looks like:

      <w:numFmt w:val="decimalZero"/>

And here is how you define pad-to-3:

      <mc:AlternateContent>
        <mc:Choice Requires="w14">
          <w:numFmt w:val="custom" w:format="001, 002, 003, ..."/>
        </mc:Choice>
        <mc:Fallback>
          <w:numFmt w:val="decimal"/>
        </mc:Fallback>
      </mc:AlternateContent>
  • This required taking the w14 branch when we hit such a conditional, we used to read the fallback branch previously.

  • This required mapping the data of the <w:numFmt> XML element not to an enumeration value, but to a pair of objects: the numbering format’s value and format.

The rest was reasonably straightforward, since the actual padding implementation just had to be generalized.

Want to start using this?

You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release too (7.0).

by Miklos Vajna at April 08, 2020 12:01 PM

March 31, 2020

Marius Popa Adrian

Compiling Flamerobin under Mac OS latest version

Updated instructions are now here https://github.com/mariuz/flamerobin/blob/master/BUILD.txt#L182 Thanks to Tomas Dvorak

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at March 31, 2020 12:00 PM

We are happy to announce the first release of Jaybird 4.

We are happy to announce the first release of Jaybird 4. Jaybird 4 is – compared to Jaybird 3 – an incremental release that builds on the foundations of Jaybird 3. The focus of this release has been on further improving JDBC support and adding support for the new data types and features of Firebird 4. The main new features are: Wire encryption support (backported to Jaybird 3.0.4) Database

by Popa Adrian Marius (noreply@blogger.com) at March 31, 2020 09:21 AM

March 30, 2020

Andreas Kainz

Bullet images update

LibreOffice 7.0 will get new bullet imges. Hope you like them. In general you can use whatever image you like, want or find from the internet, so in the Bullet image dialog there are the following examples:

by kdeonlinux at March 30, 2020 08:08 AM

Fontwork update

Jun Nogata help the LibreOffice community with new Fontwork. And now it’s ready to be in use.

It’s already in master. As not all great Artwork landed in master, I will offer an extension for additional Fontwork stuff.

A lot of work going on this days. If you like my work become a

downloads_wordmark_white_on_coral2x.jpg

by kdeonlinux at March 30, 2020 07:46 AM

March 27, 2020

Tamas Zolnai

New integration test framework in Collabora Online.

Introduction

At Collabora, we invest a lot of hard work to make LibreOffice's features available in an online environment. Recently we greatly improved the Collabora Online mobile UI, so it's more smooth to use it from a mobile device. While putting more and more work into the software, trying to support more and more different platforms, we need also to spend time improving the test frameworks we use for automatic testing. These test frameworks make sure that while we enrich the software with new features, the software remains stable during the continuous development process.

End-to-end testing in the browser

One step on this road was the integration of cypress.io test framework into Collabora Online code. cypress.io is an end-to-end test run in the browser, so any online application can be tested with it. It mainly allows us to simulate user interaction with the UI and check the event's results via the website's DOM elements. That allows us to simulate user stories and catch real-life issues in the software, so our quality measurement matches the actual user experience.

When I investigated the different alternatives for browser testing I also checked the Selenium test framework. I didn't spend more than two days on that, but I had an impression that Selenium is kind of "old" software, which tries to support many configurations, many language bindings which makes it hard to use and also makes it stuck in the current state, where it is. While cypress.io is a newer test framework, which seems more focused. It is easier to integrate into our build system and easier to use, which is a big plus because it's not enough to integrate a test framework, but developers need to learn how to use it too. I saw one advantage of Selenium: the better browser support. It supports all the main browsers (Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer), while cypress.io mainly supports only Chrome, but it improves on this area. Now it has a beta Mozilla Firefox support. So finally I decided to use cypress.io and I'm happy I did that because it nicely works.

cypress.io in Collabora Online

So cypress.io is now integrated into the Collabora Online code and we already have 150 tests mainly for mobile UI. As we submit most of our work to upstream, these tests are also available in the community version of the software. It's integrated into the software's GNU make based build system, so a make check will run these tests automatically. This is also part of the continuous integration system, so we can catch any regression instantly, before it actually hits the code. It's recommended to all developers of the online code to get familiar with the test framework, so it will be easier to understand if a test failure indicates an issue in their proposed patch. There are a set of useful notes in the source code, in the readme file: [source_dir]/cypress_test/README. Next to that, I try to add some good advice in the following paragraphs, how to investigate if any cypress test is failing on your patch.

How to check a test failure?


Interactive test runner

When you run make check the cypress tests are run in headless mode, so you can't see what happens on the UI, while the tests are running. If you see a test failure, the easiest way to understand what happens is to check it in the interactive test runner. To do that you can call make run-mobile or make run-desktop depending on what kind of test you are interested in. In interactive mode, you'll get a window, where you can select a test suite (*_spec.js file) and run that test suite only.

After you select a test suite you'll see the tests running in the browser. It's fast so probably you can't follow all the steps, but after the tests are finished you can select the steps and check screenshot for every step, so you can follow the state of the application. This way you can see how the application gets to a failure state.

Can't reproduce a failure in the interactive test runner

Sometimes, it happens that a test failure is reproducible only in headless mode. There are more options, that you can do in this case. First, you can check a screenshot taken at the point when the test failed. This screenshot is added automatically into a separate folder:

[source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress/screenshots/

This screenshot shows only the failure state, which might not be enough. You can also use the cypress command log to write out important information into the console during a test run. You can do that using the cy.log() method, called from the JS test code (this is not equivalent to console.log() method). In the case of test failure, these logs are dumped on the console output. These logs are also available here:

[source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress/logs/

A third option is to enable video recording. With video recording, the cypress test framework will generate a video of the test run, where you can see the same thing that you would see in the interactive test runner. To enable video recording you need to remove "video" : false, line from [source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress.json file. After that, running make check will record videos for all test suites you are running and put them under videos folder:

[source_dir]/cypress_test/cypress/videos/

How to run only one test?

To run one test suite you can use the spec option:

make check-mobile spec=writer/apply_font_spec.js

This spec option can be used with check-mobile and check-desktop rules, depending on what kind of test you intend to run. This is the headless run, but in the interactive test runner, you also can do that by selecting one test suite from the list. With these options, you can run a test suite, but a test suite means more tests. If you would like to run only one test you need to combine a test suite run, with using only() method. You need to open the test suite file and add only() to the definition of the specific test case:

- it('Apply font name.', function() {
+ it.only('Apply font name.', function() {

So both the headless build and the interactive test runner will ignore any other tests in the same test suite. It's useful when somebody investigates why a specific test fails.

Summary

So that's it for now. I hope these pieces of information are useful for getting familiar with the new test framework. Fortunately, the cypress.io test framework provides us nice tools to write new tests and check test failures. I'm still working on the test framework to customize it to our online environment. Hopefully, using this test framework will improve software quality in the long term.

by Tamás Zolnai (noreply@blogger.com) at March 27, 2020 09:39 AM

March 20, 2020

Andreas Kainz

Icon gallery

I submit a new gallery for LibreOffice called Icons. It show some usefull icons/symbols which can be used in all LibreOffice apps. If you search for app icons they area already available in the GUI widget prototyping extension.

Please test the extension and give me feedback.

by kdeonlinux at March 20, 2020 11:47 PM

Arrows gallery

For the LibreOffice 7.0 release I work on galleries. One which is ready for testers is a new/updated arrows gallery.

You can test the arrow gallery by install the extension (upload to the extension page was done. Pending for the review.)

by kdeonlinux at March 20, 2020 11:21 PM

March 10, 2020

Miklos Vajna

My hack week at Collabora: (start of) padded numbering in Writer

As mentioned in a previous such report, a hack week is when we are allowed to hack on anything we want in LibreOffice for a few days at Collabora. I used this time to implement core support for padded numbering in Writer.

Motivation

Padded numbering is a style where you insert 0 characters in front of an otherwise normal (Arabic) numbering, making sure that the result always has at least N characters. Up to now, you had to number your content manually to have this effect, while Word supports this feature.

OOXML supports padding up to 2, 3, 4 and 5 characters. Padding up to 2 characters is the older feature, supported in DOC and RTF as well, so I focused on that piece.

Results so far

Here is how the current, the baseline and the reference rendering of padded numbering looks like:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/n-XvNw0xPkBK_u9eqVraa7meGxYPX8dpKtfmHkN54y60x5HvUhQBouGEnfLX3XjzQFDjG7oWhCGVvFLnINneGZwDIjB8FW1hgwYSEpWrt3kniLGeKNFAfpa_Y9NGHNadj50ecy3FVw=s300-p-k
Figure 1. numbering-padded2.docx, current
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/BgSZhU4WNkwTvOejqbfaKSiEQUudnDCUeVaQ62xPETwzhP0-FUPsBZMrUrgwhfi3fSou3YIQ_Yb0tuDzJmeIxHk2LhOpS9ENvxwLCr3-aCn4rIS0e9vYOh2__cHAvP82-MUJzQS-Zg=s300-p-k
Figure 2. numbering-padded2.docx, baseline
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/TXI-klcS5xzPUX0SaV_iqhweMcUX0aN1rc7rwwAbKdulmPYZ6wcYqcQTO94aHGZl_p4FuVSt_drCI1blKRHLupNjC6j08GjdppbkJ8o72xNmjpV_X2_LcPUgZmOfGBeUJRhDKptxqg=s300-p-k
Figure 3. numbering-padded2.docx, reference

You can see how 0 is inserted before 1..9, but not before 10.

How is this implemented?

If you would like to know a bit more about how this works, continue reading… :-)

Then I found that footnote numbering needs explicit handling, so added support for padding in that case as well:

Finally I had a little bit of remaining time, so I extended support for the recently added Chicago numbering:

Future work

Padding up to 3, 4 and 5 characters would be possible to do, but it’s DOCX-only, and uses a different markup, planned to be done later.

All this is available in master (towards LibreOffice 7.0), so you can grab a daily build and try it out right now. :-)

by Miklos Vajna at March 10, 2020 08:43 AM

March 09, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: February 2020

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.3.5 was announced on February, 20
  2. LibreOffice 6.4.1 was announced on February, 27
  3. LibreOffice was present at FOSDEM and many presentations about LibreOffice were given on February, 1
  4. A 2 days Hackfest took place in Brussels right after FOSDEM
  5. Michael Weghorn implemented native PopupMenus for the qt5/kf5 VCL plugin
  6. Stephan Bergmann (Red Hat) fixed blurry text in macOS and did many code cleanups
  7. Jim Raykowski continued to improve Navigator in general and its context menu
  8. Seth Chaiklin made many Help update patches
  9. Luboš Luňák (Collabora) continues to polish Skia library in LibreOffice
  10. Maxim Monastirsky added Highlighting tab for shapes and comments to Format>Character dialog in Writer and in Calc
  11. Noel Grandin (Collabora) did many cleanups under the hood, including changes that speed up development
  12. Jan Holešovský (Collabora) enabled spell-checking on Android
  13. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) continued the crucial user interface backend work and also did many cleanups to the code
  14. Mike Kaganski (Collabora) made it so decimals input into Calc are represented with the correct precision value
  15. Michael Stahl (CIB) improved DOCX exporting of footnote separators and rotated text fields
  16. Jan-Marek Glogowski (CIB) fixed several qt5/kf5 issues
  17. Xisco Fauli (TDF) added basic unittests for LWP files
  18. Gábor Kelemen (NISZ) fixed issues with missing titles and period separators in charts
  19. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) improved label placement for stacked area charts and fixed XLSX exporting of chart line markers
  20. Bakos Attila (NISZ) fixed chart wrap setting with DOCX import and shape anchoring to table with DOCX export
  21. László Németh (NISZ) fixed several issues with tables in imported DOCX files
  22. Szabolcs Tóth (NISZ) fixed inherited list level of custom styles with DOCX import
  23. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed several issues with chart label positioning with OOXML import and export
  24. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) fixed several DOCX import and export issues and implemented semi-transparent text for Writer
  25. Eike Rathke (Red Hat) improved handling of named references in Calc
  26. Julien Nabet fixed the precision and scale for decimal and numeric fields in Firebird databases
  27. Armin Le Grand improved the performance of rendering dashed lines
  28. Arnaud Versini added minimum support for PDF/A3
  29. Serge Krot (CIB) fixed DOCX exporting of bold text under certain conditions
  30. Andreas Kainz made many UI improvements in Sidebar
  31. Rizal Muttaqin made many improvements in most of the icon themes
  32. Heiko Tietze (TDF) added a note in the UI for Draw page renaming conflicts
  33. Jens Carl moved several Java tests to C++

Reported Bugs

679 bugs, 98 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 442 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 32 )
  2. sdc.blanco ( 22 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 21 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 16 )
  5. Mike Kaganski ( 13 )
  6. Rizal Muttaqin ( 13 )
  7. Robert Großkopf ( 9 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 9 )
  9. stdedos ( 8 )
  10. Timur ( 7 )

Triaged Bugs

668 bugs have been triaged by 95 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 159 )
  2. Dieter ( 83 )
  3. Julien Nabet ( 51 )
  4. Heiko Tietze ( 47 )
  5. Oliver Brinzing ( 25 )
  6. Aron Budea ( 22 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 22 )
  8. raal ( 18 )
  9. eisa01 ( 14 )
  10. Alex Thurgood ( 11 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

578 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

242 bugs have been fixed by 54 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. Caolán McNamara ( 32 )
  2. Noel Grandin ( 10 )
  3. Jan-Marek Glogowski ( 9 )
  4. László Németh ( 8 )
  5. Michael Weghorn ( 8 )
  6. Seth Chaiklin ( 8 )
  7. Miklos Vajna ( 7 )
  8. Eike Rathke ( 7 )
  9. Balazs Varga ( 6 )
  10. Samuel Mehrbrodt ( 6 )

List of critical bugs fixed

  1. tdf#122218 After Update to 6.1.4 on macOS fonts are blurred on retina display (xcode 10) ( Thanks to Christian Lohmaier )
  2. tdf#130482 Can’t align text in a textbox ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  3. tdf#130614 Crash in: SfxItemPool::IsInRange(unsigned short) ( Thanks to Xisco Faulí )
  4. tdf#130959 LibreOffice crashes when opening files with non-existing hyperlinks ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#128873 Calc – long time to open file in 6.4 beta ( Thanks to Serge Krot )
  2. tdf#129529 Cannot open 819-pages ODT ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  3. tdf#129912 Cannot open DOC – regression ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  4. tdf#130373 Since update, substitute color only works if left set to transparent. ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  5. tdf#130483 Crash on pasting a table from Writer ( Thanks to Mark Hung )
  6. tdf#130623 Base: Empty Field Properties (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  7. tdf#130760 Impress crashes on broken hyperlink click ( Thanks to Samuel Mehrbrodt )
  8. tdf#130794 kf5: Keyboard input ignored ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  9. tdf#130809 File dialogs in Mac OS are in German ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  10. tdf#130878 Report does not show label-fields when run in 7.0 ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  11. tdf#130917 FILESAVE DOCX Signature line export creates invalid document ( Thanks to Samuel Mehrbrodt )
  12. tdf#130951 FILEOPEN: DOCX: picture does not display doc saved by MSWord ( Thanks to Armin Le Grand )
  13. tdf#130960 edit / track changes / compare documents does not work ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  14. tdf#91219 FILESAVE: Crash when anchoring a shape with a textbox to a frame that is anchored to that shape ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#127205 Crash when terminating the StarDesktop from running a document macro ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  2. tdf#129809 LibreOffice Writer crash while moving one letter with hyperlink (gtk3/kf5) ( Thanks to Michael Weghorn )
  3. tdf#130274 TRACK CHANGES: Crash in swlo.dll with track changes enabled and AutoCorrect ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  4. tdf#130340 cmd + space = crashes reliably for keymap window ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  5. tdf#130414 Crash when setting window position via API (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#130483 Crash on pasting a table from Writer ( Thanks to Mark Hung )
  7. tdf#130499 kf5: Crash when closing Writer after D’n’D of text ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  8. tdf#130513 CRASH: Writer crashes changing UI to notebookbar (win) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  9. tdf#130541 Crash after changing text type property of a text box control ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  10. tdf#130555 Crash when clearing the ‘Find’ text field ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  11. tdf#130614 Crash in: SfxItemPool::IsInRange(unsigned short) ( Thanks to Xisco Faulí )
  12. tdf#130658 Crash on adding word to User-defined dictionary (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  13. tdf#130756 CRASH: traversing tabs with Ctrl+PageUp/Down (gen) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  14. tdf#130760 Impress crashes on broken hyperlink click ( Thanks to Samuel Mehrbrodt )
  15. tdf#130831 CRASH when displaying a dialog containing a checkbox ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  16. tdf#130922 CRASH: Moving backwards in Paste Table wizard (gen) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  17. tdf#130952 CRASH: launching Bullets & Numbering dialog from sidebar (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  18. tdf#130959 LibreOffice crashes when opening files with non-existing hyperlinks ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  19. tdf#91219 FILESAVE: Crash when anchoring a shape with a textbox to a frame that is anchored to that shape ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#128873 Calc – long time to open file in 6.4 beta ( Thanks to Serge Krot )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#42695 [UI] When Navigator is docked, new documents show an inactive “List Box”. When Navigator is undocked and “List Box” is turned “Off” then no items are shown when Navigator is docked again ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  2. tdf#57307 Basic IDE: adding variable to Watch window performs incorrectly if variable name contains_underscores ( Thanks to Andreas Heinisch )
  3. tdf#57879 EDITING : consider an underscore to be part of a string ( Thanks to Andreas Heinisch )
  4. tdf#84553 Detect and warn of Windows Antivirus in configure … ( Thanks to Michel Thomas )
  5. tdf#90749 support leader lines for data labels ( Thanks to Balazs Varga )
  6. tdf#91219 FILESAVE: Crash when anchoring a shape with a textbox to a frame that is anchored to that shape ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  7. tdf#92472 FILEOPEN: First legacy checkbox in row has too large dimensions on docx import ( Thanks to László Németh )
  8. tdf#92484 UI: lock toolbar by default ( Thanks to A_GAN )
  9. tdf#94234 Period separator missing from data series label formatting dialog ( Thanks to Gabor Kelemen )
  10. tdf#95495 Fileopen: List levels not recognized in .docx custom outline numbering ( Thanks to Szabolcs Toth )

WORKSFORME bugs

65 bugs have been retested by 31 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Julien Nabet ( 7 )
  2. eisa01 ( 6 )
  3. Timur ( 5 )
  4. Dieter ( 5 )
  5. Heiko Tietze ( 5 )
  6. Xisco Faulí ( 4 )
  7. raal ( 4 )
  8. Buovjaga ( 3 )
  9. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )
  10. Aron Budea ( 2 )

DUPLICATED bugs

172 bugs have been duplicated by 38 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 42 )
  2. Dieter ( 18 )
  3. V Stuart Foote ( 15 )
  4. Maxim Monastirsky ( 12 )
  5. Timur ( 11 )
  6. Julien Nabet ( 8 )
  7. Heiko Tietze ( 7 )
  8. Alex Thurgood ( 5 )
  9. eisa01 ( 4 )
  10. Aron Budea ( 4 )

Verified bug fixes

82 bugs have been verified by 14 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 60 )
  2. Timur ( 5 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 2 )
  5. Michael Weghorn ( 2 )
  6. V Stuart Foote ( 2 )
  7. Julien Nabet ( 2 )
  8. Oliver Grimm ( 1 )
  9. Kevin Suo ( 1 )
  10. Heiko Tietze ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

344 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 31 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. Dieter ( 79 )
  2. Roman Kuznetsov ( 75 )
  3. Rizal Muttaqin ( 28 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 22 )
  5. Aron Budea ( 20 )
  6. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 15 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 13 )
  8. Heiko Tietze ( 8 )
  9. Xisco Faulí ( 8 )
  10. Michael Weghorn ( 8 )

Regression Bugs

119 bugs have been set as regressions by 24 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 55 )
  2. raal ( 8 )
  3. Oliver Brinzing ( 7 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 7 )
  5. Roman Kuznetsov ( 6 )
  6. eisa01 ( 5 )
  7. Robert Großkopf ( 5 )
  8. Aron Budea ( 3 )
  9. Dieter ( 3 )
  10. Alex Thurgood ( 2 )

Bisected Bugs

108 bugs have been bisected by 11 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 64 )
  2. Aron Budea ( 16 )
  3. raal ( 8 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 7 )
  5. Michael Weghorn ( 3 )
  6. Oliver Brinzing ( 3 )
  7. Timur ( 2 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 2 )
  9. Roman Kuznetsov ( 1 )
  10. Justin L ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of Open bibisectRequests

Check the current list of open bibisectrequests here

Evolution of Highest Priority Bugs

Check the current list of highest priority bugs here

Evolution of High Priority Bugs

Check the current list of high priority bugs here

Thank you all for making Libreoffice rock!
Join us and help to keep LibreOffice super reliable!
Check the Get Involved page out now!

by x1sc0 at March 09, 2020 12:25 PM

March 04, 2020

CIB News

LibreOffice 6.4 – Wieder dicht am Microsoft Office Paket dran

Mit jedem LibreOffice-Release tragen wir ein wenig mehr dazu bei, dass das Microsoft-Office-(fast)Monopol sich dem Ende nähert. Und wir sind stolz darauf! Auch Version 6.4 wurde von CIB mitentwickelt und enthält eine Reihe neuer nutzvoller Funktionen, die sicherlich wieder die Anzahl der Fans dieses beliebten Open Source Pakets erhöhen wird: Jetzt mit integriertem QR-Code-Generator. Die … LibreOffice 6.4 – Wieder dicht am Microsoft Office Paket dran weiterlesen

Der Beitrag LibreOffice 6.4 – Wieder dicht am Microsoft Office Paket dran erschien zuerst auf CIB blog.

by CIB Marketing at March 04, 2020 08:41 AM

February 26, 2020

Collabora Community

Collabora brings smooth editing to Android and iOS

Cambridge, February 27th, 2020, 12:00 CET – Today we are releasing Collabora Office for Android and iOS which will allow you to edit documents directly on your phone or tablet, guaranteeing your privacy and putting you in full control of your data and documents. This release fully integrates the iOS and Android apps into our Collabora Office product family. They are now a supported part of our business suite and come with every Collabora Office Enterprise subscription. Take a look: it’s a great app: feature rich, providing smooth editing, a polished user experience and lots of design goodness.

Rich editing for mobile devices – developed with your privacy in mind!

Collabora Office for Android and iOS
From opening … to viewing … to a rich editing experience

Collabora Office for Android   (minimal version 5.0) and iOS is fully open source and brings you slick and useful editing features, like rich copy and paste, that the competition fails to deliver.
The app does not depend on external storage or services, so can be used offline. There is no longer a reason to hand over your data to somebody else to get rich mobile editing. Thus you can regain control over your documents and edit them without compromising your privacy!

One-handed touch tools for all sorts of editing

 

Collabora Office allows tables to be changed easily and in many ways. Handles in the document, as well as an attractive palette of tools, helps you perfect your table layout.
In our new mobile app, you will find the features where you expect them to be, giving you access to powerful functionality.

Slides and sheets at your fingertips

Choose layout and animations for presentations. A unique feature allows slide masters to be edited as well as applied.

Collabora Office for iOS and Android comes with a refined touch of usability. Sort the slides in your presentations using the convenient slide sorter. Scroll through the different sheets of your spreadsheet with the touch of a fingertip. Mobile document editing has never been easier and more fun.

Experience the polished user interface & design

Lay out of presentation in Collabora Office for iOS and Android
Full control over layout of presentations

Rotating an image in a presentation
Rotate images with your fingertips

Text highlighting in a presentation
Highlight text with the tool at the palette

Copy & paste rich text objects on mobile

Our mobile solution stands out from all its competitors because of the smooth way in which it facilitates editing on mobile devices. Collabora Office allows you to actually copy and paste rich document content on your iOS or Android device. Try it out!

Attractive icons and an attractive layout

Sheet editing options in context menu

Collabora Office for iOS and Android text document
Editing your text file

Collabora Office for iOS and Android presentation
Editing the content of a presentation

Native platform document storage

Collabora Office gives you back control over your documents. This includes the freedom to decide where to store the documents you edit from your mobile device. Our app allows you to easily integrate with privacy respecting, open source storage services such as Nextcloud, ownCloud or Seafile as well as proprietary file services such as OneDrive, Dropbox etc. Naturally you can also store and edit documents locally on your device without an external storage space. We think it’s good to notice that all the features in Collabora Office are available for all users, independent if it’s for private or for business use.

Yet more polish

Smooth inertial scrolling has been added for this release, with significant work on performance and stability. We’ve added the ability to export to various different file formats, to provide a great collaboration and interoperability experience with the users of other apps. Many usability wins too numerous to mention have been implemented. We have bundled spell-checking for English, French, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese and German for now – while we investigate shrinking the installation size to fit more. (Note selecting spell checking language currently is only on tablets.)

Two apps – one philosophy

Creating new document in iOS

Opening documents in the Android app

Last year, we paved the road so that the development of our mobile apps would be more consistent. In particular, the completely new development of the iOS app blazed the train. Both apps now share a substantially common codebase with our flagship product Collabora Online.

After our successful implementation on iOS, we re-used the same approach for our Android app. This replaced the existing LibreOffice Viewer code which had seen only very little activity for a long time, creating a fully functional and productive mobile office solution.

Welcome to the Collabora Office family

With today’s release, the apps for Android and iOS have officially become a part of our Collabora Office for Enterprise product. The family is now complete. These mobile apps complement Collabora Online and our existing desktop versions for Linux, MacOS and Windows. What does this mean for you? We can provide SLAs for our customers, as well as a close product management relationship to help steer our future development. Each improvement or issue addressed for one solution (online, mobile, desktop) can enhance all the others. Last but not least, it means the consistent and sustainable development of the mobile software.

For use on F-Droid, please use the APK file from this page.

Thanks to everyone who contributed!

Collabora invested huge effort and resources to bring into being a fully functional open source office suite for mobile devices. This success is built on the support of many individuals, the great LibreOffice community. Fundamentally this could not have been achieved without the support of SUSE, CloudOn, Smoose, Adfinis SyGroup and The Document Foundations’ generous historic donors. We cannot thank everyone involved enough for their passionate work. Please check our previous articles about the beta releases of the Android and iOS app, where we credit several of the people involved and where you can read more about their valuable contributions. All of our code is contributed to LibreOffice, and can be expected in LibreOffice 7, although we have our own theme. Would you like to be part of the story ? get involved today.


About Collabora Productivity

Collabora Productivity is the driving force behind putting LibreOffice in the cloud, providing Collabora Online and a range of products and consulting to enterprise and government. Powered by the largest team of certified LibreOffice engineers in the world, it is a leading contributor to the LibreOffice codebase and community. Collabora Office for Desktop and Collabora Online provide a business-hardened office suite with long-term, multi-platform support. Collabora Productivity is a division of Collabora, the global software consultancy dedicated to providing the benefits of Open Source to the commercial world, specializing in mobile, automotive and consumer electronics industries. For more information, visit www.collaboraoffice.com or follow @CollaboraOffice on Twitter.




The post Collabora brings smooth editing to Android and iOS appeared first on Collabora Productivity.

by Marc Rodrigues at February 26, 2020 11:31 AM

Miklos Vajna

Semi-transparent text in Writer

The problem

Last year I posted about work to have semi-transparent rendering of not only shape fill and shape borders, but also shape text in Draw. Now the same semi-transparent text feature is available in Writer as well. This improves compatibility with Word, which supports the same feature in its DOCX format. You can access the new option in the Format → Character dialog.

Result

Here is how the new, old and reference rendering looks like:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/oifzSVcdmKhomkQQKy4CNnPmamHtoo9CwRsbg9_ekbeK9Ov_4dFrzrJrYmDLHZNm-IvsoYNy8YfSs5kp4yEA42jybRO-8P-YKI8fYRu5ColRbzFHQBotP4MvkjanZG7JX9vP8Mcnnw=w640
Figure 1. Semi-transparent text in Writer, new rendering
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/RxtyxxIdrW14TtN30cf37e7RNHwnQpxlX-zhjhpWrggjStEERXvUnH7eDv8acM_8DcySNpnvpz5yWdwO12_cmQ6ZyCo4-fpIOdd3x9Q8SAXxAwuyMhfmjzhvS9VDBps8tQX-xB70RA=w640
Figure 2. Semi-transparent text in Writer, old rendering
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/6rkCyXnzfiVN96D1h8PiKSIva1ydRFQXzUbXbbLC-9plXOUJnMRHZT2ba4eKt7W1wqfL3vscVgE1-QB5ztbp2uqSmguOALV8wyZDnCF4LPlyHSbVEm5atwZvf29w3PzRmjy11aQahA=w640
Figure 3. Semi-transparent text in Writer, reference rendering

Want to start using this?

You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release too (7.0).

by Miklos Vajna at February 26, 2020 10:25 AM

February 12, 2020

LibreOffice QA Blog

QA/Dev Report: January 2020

General Activities

  1. LibreOffice 6.4 was released on January 29 containing many performance and interoperability improvements
  2. Participants in Ankara, Turkey bootcamp completed many easy hacks
  3. Participants in the Free Software Winter Camp 2020 in Eskişehir, Turkey completed many easy hacks
  4. Noel Grandin (Collabora) further sped up loading an XLSX file with lots of comments. Noel also continued converting XML handling bits to use the performant FastParser API
  5. Mike Kaganski (Collabora) made it so functions in Calc can use case sensitive regular expressions. Mike also fixed an Excel compatibility issue involving booleans
  6. Caolán McNamara (Red Hat) continued the welding of UI elements, focusing on the Sidebar
  7. Tamás Bunth (Collabora) improved chart label interoperability with OOXML files
  8. Miklos Vajna (Collabora) made rotated text in Writer’s table rows with automatic height behave better
  9. Seth Chaiklin made dozens of improvements and additions to Help content. He also triaged and re-tested many bugs.
  10. Rizal Muttaqin improved most of the icon themes and Sifr in particular.
  11. Thorsten Wagner fixed a rendering issue in the character formatting font dropdown on macOS
  12. Serge Krot (CIB) improved the performance of Impress when typing into a list having an animation applied to it
  13. László Németh and Szabolcs Tóth (NISZ) fixed many DOCX table issues
  14. Jim Raykowski made the Navigator item category list appearance more user friendly. He also fixed a bunch of Navigator and Sidebar issues
  15. Balázs Varga (NISZ) fixed many OOXML chart label issues
  16. Tünde Tóth (NISZ) fixed a few issues with OOXML chart legends and data labels
  17. Luboš Luňák (Collabora) continued polishing the Skia graphics engine integration
  18. Heiko Tietze (TDF) and Andreas Kainz made many improvements to dialogs and Sidebar views
  19. Michael Stahl (CIB) made several fixes in PyUNO and Python build-related things. He also added an option to show markers for bookmarks inside the document text
  20. Andreas Kainz revampted the Compress Image dialog
  21. Guilhem Moulin and Ilmari Lauhakangas (TDF) improved the logerrit script, which helps when sending patches to Gerrit
  22. Regina Henschel implemented a fix for the skewing of drawing objects
  23. Luca Carlon added an SVG version of the Breeze dark icon set
  24. Katarina Behrens (CIB) fixed issues affecting the presentation console under Linux
  25. Tomaž Vajngerl (Collabora) implemented accessibility checker and support for PDF/UA specs

Reported Bugs

604 bugs, 64 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 363 people.

Top 10 Reporters

  1. sdc.blanco ( 35 )
  2. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 18 )
  3. Xisco Faulí ( 15 )
  4. Mike Kaganski ( 14 )
  5. andreas_k ( 14 )
  6. Roman Kuznetsov ( 11 )
  7. R. Green ( 9 )
  8. TorrAB ( 9 )
  9. Telesto ( 8 )
  10. Regina Henschel ( 7 )

Triaged Bugs

607 bugs have been triaged by 83 people.

Top 10 Triagers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 129 )
  2. Heiko Tietze ( 63 )
  3. Dieter ( 57 )
  4. Julien Nabet ( 52 )
  5. Timur ( 30 )
  6. Roman Kuznetsov ( 23 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 21 )
  8. Oliver Brinzing ( 18 )
  9. m.a.riosv ( 17 )
  10. Mike Kaganski ( 13 )

Resolution of resolved bugs

555 bugs have been set to RESOLVED.

Check the following sections for more information about bugs resolved as FIXED, WORKSFORME and DUPLICATE.

Fixed Bugs

222 bugs have been fixed by 50 people.

Top 10 Fixers

  1. Caolán McNamara ( 23 )
  2. Mike Kaganski ( 18 )
  3. Seth Chaiklin ( 15 )
  4. Miklos Vajna ( 8 )
  5. László Németh ( 8 )
  6. Jim Raykowski ( 8 )
  7. Balazs Varga ( 6 )
  8. Luboš Luňák ( 6 )
  9. Michael Stahl ( 5 )
  10. Szabolcs Toth ( 4 )

List of critical bugs fixed

  1. tdf#127619 macOS — LibreOffice crash within 40s after opening app when online update automatically enabled, or with check from the Extension manager — https certificate issues ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  2. tdf#129484 Crash when trying to view property of a component from forms (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  3. tdf#130090 Create New Folder in the Save Dialog crashes with the gen (X11) VCL plugin ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  4. tdf#130179 CRASH: inserting comment to picture ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  5. tdf#130286 Crash in: SwDrawTextShell::Execute(SfxRequest &) ( Thanks to Szymon Kłos )

List of high severity bugs fixed

  1. tdf#125662 Bad allocation crash while saving Calc with copied columns (x86) ( Thanks to Dennis Francis )
  2. tdf#128782 When execute undo, Text box moves. ( Thanks to Vasily Melenchuk )
  3. tdf#129883 Section links are lost on save and reload (see c3-c4) ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  4. tdf#129887 CRASH: Scrolling down document ( Thanks to Serge Krot )
  5. tdf#129908 Crash at Data > Group and outlone > AutoOutline ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  6. tdf#130075 EDITING – While pasting data in a table, selecting “Next” makes Base crash ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  7. tdf#130093 FILEOPEN: LWP: General input/output error ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  8. tdf#130214 CRASH: importing file ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  9. tdf#93389 Document recovery strips encryption ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  10. tdf#94801 Fileopen DOCX: Text in table different width in Writer (multiple lines) and Word (single line) for Microsoft fonts – 0,1cm difference ( Thanks to László Németh )

List of crashes fixed

  1. tdf#125662 Bad allocation crash while saving Calc with copied columns (x86) ( Thanks to Dennis Francis )
  2. tdf#127619 macOS — LibreOffice crash within 40s after opening app when online update automatically enabled, or with check from the Extension manager — https certificate issues ( Thanks to Stephan Bergmann )
  3. tdf#129382 CRASH: Importing a specific file ( See comment 6 ) ( Thanks to Vasily Melenchuk )
  4. tdf#129412 Crash when registered data source is not available. ( Thanks to Julien Nabet )
  5. tdf#129484 Crash when trying to view property of a component from forms (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  6. tdf#129546 Skia: Crash when starting LO without supported device ( Thanks to Luboš Luňák )
  7. tdf#129659 CRASH on file opening ( Thanks to Jan-Marek Glogowski )
  8. tdf#129712 Crash in: mergedlo.dll after pasting as Unformatted text in Draw’s Text box ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  9. tdf#129798 Crash in: SwViewShell::GetDoc() — show print with Field dialog open ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  10. tdf#129805 Crash when copying the content of a complex DOCX ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  11. tdf#129839 Crash inspecting properties of cell range object in IDE ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  12. tdf#129850 CRASH: Inserting table (gtk3) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  13. tdf#129887 CRASH: Scrolling down document ( Thanks to Serge Krot )
  14. tdf#129908 Crash at Data > Group and outlone > AutoOutline ( Thanks to Noel Grandin )
  15. tdf#130075 EDITING – While pasting data in a table, selecting “Next” makes Base crash ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  16. tdf#130090 Create New Folder in the Save Dialog crashes with the gen (X11) VCL plugin ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  17. tdf#130155 Writer navigator crashes when + is pressed on entries without children ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  18. tdf#130179 CRASH: inserting comment to picture ( Thanks to Miklos Vajna )
  19. tdf#130214 CRASH: importing file ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  20. tdf#130239 CRASH: Closing LibreOffice while Infobox is displayed ( gtk3 ) ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  21. tdf#130286 Crash in: SwDrawTextShell::Execute(SfxRequest &) ( Thanks to Szymon Kłos )

List of performance issues fixed

  1. tdf#129158 sorting multiple selected rows leads to CALC hanging ( Thanks to Caolán McNamara )
  2. tdf#129708 Impress: Long operation during typing in animated list ( Thanks to Serge Krot )

List of old bugs ( more than 4 years old ) fixed

  1. tdf#45589 Show bookmarks: make them visible in a document ( Thanks to Michael Stahl )
  2. tdf#48436 Data Label Placement needs absolute coordinates ( Thanks to Balazs Varga )
  3. tdf#54938 Adapt supportsService implementations to cppu::supportsService ( Thanks to Batuhan Taskaya )
  4. tdf#57113 Macros: Unicode vs. password protected user libraries ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  5. tdf#77796 FILEOPEN: DOCX – Table cell padding (defined in table style) not imported correctly ( Thanks to László Németh )
  6. tdf#78840 Add the regular expression (?ismwx-ismwx: … ) Flag settings. Evaluate parenthesized expression with specifics flags enabled or -disabled. To have a case sensitive mode in functions using regular expressions. ( Thanks to Eike Rathke )
  7. tdf#83779 FILESAVE: Error in saving as Excel files – logical boolean type of FALSE and TRUE values not preserved during input ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  8. tdf#88496 FORMATTING Multiple row table header pushed to next page if rows do not fit (unless one sets table properties .. uncheck Repeat Heading). behavior different from MS Word ( Thanks to László Németh )
  9. tdf#88713 Cycling through Navigator reminders is done in the wrong order ( Thanks to Jim Raykowski )
  10. tdf#90069 DOCX: Font style table inconsistencies, new cells resetting font styles ( Thanks to László Németh )
  11. tdf#92497 Update documentation for style management group button in Styles & Formatting sidebar ( Thanks to Seth Chaiklin )
  12. tdf#93389 Document recovery strips encryption ( Thanks to Mike Kaganski )
  13. tdf#94411 In alphabetical indexes f. and ff. should be used – not p. or pp. ( Thanks to Seth Chaiklin )
  14. tdf#94801 Fileopen DOCX: Text in table different width in Writer (multiple lines) and Word (single line) for Microsoft fonts – 0,1cm difference ( Thanks to László Németh )
  15. tdf#95033 Borders missing from some table cells in DOCX file (borders element of tblPrEx tag) ( Thanks to László Németh )

WORKSFORME bugs

96 bugs have been retested by 33 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 18 )
  2. Timur ( 11 )
  3. Buovjaga ( 11 )
  4. sdc.blanco ( 8 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 8 )
  6. Telesto ( 6 )
  7. Cor Nouws ( 4 )
  8. b. ( 3 )
  9. Heiko Tietze ( 3 )
  10. Terrence Enger ( 2 )

DUPLICATED bugs

121 bugs have been duplicated by 32 people.

Top 10 testers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 22 )
  2. Timur ( 19 )
  3. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 12 )
  4. V Stuart Foote ( 11 )
  5. Julien Nabet ( 8 )
  6. Heiko Tietze ( 6 )
  7. Oliver Brinzing ( 5 )
  8. sdc.blanco ( 3 )
  9. Dieter ( 3 )
  10. Roman Kuznetsov ( 3 )

Verified bug fixes

83 bugs have been verified by 15 people.

Top 10 Verifiers

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 60 )
  2. Dieter ( 6 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 4 )
  4. Timur ( 2 )
  5. Gerhard Weydt ( 1 )
  6. V Stuart Foote ( 1 )
  7. Gerald Pfeifer ( 1 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 1 )
  9. mhall ( 1 )
  10. Ming Hua ( 1 )

Categorized Bugs

302 bugs have been categorized with a metabug by 32 people.

Top 10 Categorizers

  1. sdc.blanco ( 62 )
  2. Dieter ( 55 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 41 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 21 )
  5. V Stuart Foote ( 21 )
  6. Eyal Rozenberg ( 19 )
  7. Aron Budea ( 10 )
  8. DaeHyun Sung ( 8 )
  9. Buovjaga ( 7 )
  10. Oliver Brinzing ( 7 )

Regression Bugs

77 bugs have been set as regressions by 18 people.

Top 10

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 31 )
  2. Timur ( 12 )
  3. Roman Kuznetsov ( 9 )
  4. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 3 )
  5. Telesto ( 3 )
  6. Buovjaga ( 2 )
  7. V Stuart Foote ( 2 )
  8. m.a.riosv ( 2 )
  9. raal ( 2 )
  10. Cor Nouws ( 2 )

Bisected Bugs

62 bugs have been bisected by 11 people.

Top 10 Bisecters

  1. Xisco Faulí ( 33 )
  2. Telesto ( 7 )
  3. raal ( 6 )
  4. Aron Budea ( 5 )
  5. Mihkel Tõnnov ( 2 )
  6. Roman Kuznetsov ( 2 )
  7. NISZ LibreOffice Team ( 2 )
  8. Kevin Suo ( 2 )
  9. Buovjaga ( 1 )
  10. Timur ( 1 )

Evolution of Unconfirmed Bugs

Check the current list of unconfirmed bugs here

Evolution of Open Regressions

Check the current list of open regressions here

Evolution of Open bibisectRequests

Check the current list of open bibisectrequests here

Evolution of Highest Priority Bugs

Check the current list of highest priority bugs here

Evolution of High Priority Bugs

Check the current list of high priority bugs here

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by x1sc0 at February 12, 2020 03:39 PM